(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogue of the instructors and students in the State Normal School at Salem"

SlNORMALSa 
LEM MASSACHUSETTS 




SIXTY-NINTH YEAR 



1922-192; 



MARCH 1925 



State Normal School 
salem massachusetts 




SIXTY-NINTH YEAR 

1922-192? 
MARCH 192? 



Publication of this Document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration. 



Calendar 



192^ 



February 24, Saturday- 
March 5, Monday 
April 28, Saturday 
May 7, Monday . 
May 30, Wednesday 
June 7, Thursday 
June 8, Friday . 
June 21, Thursday 
June 22, Friday . 
September 5, Wednesday 
September 4, 5, 6, 7 

September 10, Monday 
September 11, Tuesday 
September 12, Wednesday 
October 12, Friday 
November 29, Thursday 
November 30, Friday . 
December 21, Friday . 



Recess begins 

Recess ends at 9.30 a.m. 

Recess begins 

Recess ends at 9.30 a.m. 

Memorial Day: a holiday 

Entrance examinations ^ 

Entrance examinations ^ 

Graduation exercises at 10.30 a.m. 

Training school closes 

Training school opens at 9 a.m. 

Conference of Massachusetts Normal 

School Teachers* Association 
Entrance examinations ^ 
Entrance examinations i 
Academic year begins at 9.30 a.m. 
Columbus Day: a holiday 
Thanksgiving Day: a holiday 2 
A holiday 
Recess begins at the close of school 



1924 



January 2, Wednesday 
January 28, Monday 
February 22, Friday 
March 1, Saturday 
March 10, Monday 
Good Friday 
May 3, Saturday 
May 12, Monday 
May 30, Friday . 
June 5, Thursday 
June 6, Friday . 
June 26, Thursday 
June 27, Friday . 
September 3, Wednesday 
September 8, Monday 
September 9, Tuesday 
September 10, Wednesday 



Recess ends at 9.30 a.m. 
Second half year begins 
Washington's birthday: a holiday 
Recess begins 
Recess ends at 9.30 a.m. 
A holiday 
Recess begins 
Recess ends at 9.30 a.m. 
Memorial Day: a holiday 
Entrance examinations ^ 
Entrance examinations ^ 
Graduation exercises at 10.30 a.m. 
Training school closes 
Training school opens at 9 a.m. 
Entrance examinations ^ 
Entrance examinations ^ 
Academic year begins at 9.30 a.m. 



1 See program of examinations, page 4. 

2 The school will be closed at noon on Wednesday, November 28. 

Note. — The daily sessions of the school are from 9.30 to 12.05, and from 1.05 to 3.30 o'clock. 
The time from 8.30 to 9.30 and from 2.45 to 3.30 o'clock is to be used for study by all students 
who are in the building. From 2.45 to 3.30 o'clock, all students are subject to appointments 
for conferences with members of the faculty at the discretion of the latter. Lectures before 
the entire school will frequently be held at this time. The regular weekly holiday of both 
the normal and the training schools is on Saturday. 

The telephone call of the normal school is Salem 375; of the training school, Salem 344. 

The principal's residence is at 357 Lafayette Street, and his telephone call is Salem 34. 



Program of Entrance Examinations 



Thursday, June 7, and Monday, September 10, 1923 
8.30-10.30. English literature and composition . . 3 units 



Foreign Language 

Commercial Subjects 

10.30-12.30. 



Social Studies 
1.30-4.30. 



Latin .... 

Stenography (including type 

writing, 
Bookkeeping . 
Commercial geography 
Commercial law 

Community civics . 

American history and civics 
(required after 1922) . 

History to about 1700 

European history since 1700 
•{ Economics 

Problems of democracy . 

Current events 

Ancient history 

English history 
^ Medieval and modern history 



2, 3, or 4 units 

1 or 2 units 

1 unit 

I or 1 unit 



^ or 1 unit 

1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 
I unit 
I unit 
^ or 1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 



Friday, June 8, and Tuesday, September 11, 1923 
Algebra . . . .1 unit 



Mathematics 
8.30-10.30. 



Foreign Language 
10.30-12.30. 



Science 
1.30-4.00. 



Fine and Practical Arts 
3.30-5.00. 



Arithmetic . 
^ Geometry 

f French 
\ Spanish 
[ German 

General science 

Biology, botany, or zoology 

Chemistry . 

Physics 

Physical geography 

Physiology and hygiene 

{Home economics . 
Manual training . 
Drawing 



^ or 1 unit 

1 unit 

2 or 3 units 
2 units 

2 or 3 units 

^ or 1 unit 
^ or 1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 
§ or 1 unit 
I or 1 unit 

1, 2, or 3 units 

1 unit 

^ or 1 unit 



The Department of Education 

Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education 



ADVISORY BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Term 
expires 

1923 Sarah Louise Arnold 

1923 Ella Lyman Cabot 

1924 Arthur H. Lowe . 

1924 Walter V, McDufpee 

1925 A. Lincoln Filene 
1925 Thomas H. Sullivan 



Riverbank Court, Cambridge 

1 Marlborough Street, Boston 

Fitchburg 

336 Central Street, Springfield 

426 Washington Street, Boston 

Slater Building, Worcester 



DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION AND 

NORMAL SCHOOLS 

Frank W. Weight, Director 



Clarence D. Kingsley 
Burr F. Jones 
Robert I. Bramhall 
Harry E. Gardner . 
Carl L. Schrader . 
Louise S. French : 



Agents and Supervisors 

Secondary education 
Elementary education 
Research and statistics 
Registration of teachers 
Physical education 
Assistant, physical education 



THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Division of Elementary and Secondary Education and Normal Schools 

Division of Vocational Education 

Division of University Extension 

Division of Immigration and Americanization 

Division of Public Libraries 

Division of the Blind 

Teachers' Retirement Board 

Massachusetts Nautical School 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Bradford-Durfeb Textile School, Fall River 

Lowell Textile School 

New Bedford Textile School 



Instructors 

THE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Joseph Asbury Pitman Principal 

Education 

Agnes Caroline Blake Dean of Women 

Librarian ; Library practice 

Charles Frederick Whitney Drawing and crafts 

Mary Alice Warren . . . Physical training, physiology and hygiene 
Gertrude Brown Goldsmith, M.A. . . . Nature study, gardening 

Fred Willis Archibald Music 

Charles Elmer Doner Penmanship 

Walter George Whitman, A.M. . . . General science and hygiene 
Verna Belle Flanders . . . . . . . Assistant, geography 

Bertha Mae Sperry, Arithmetic 

Lena Grayson FitzHugh, A.B. . . . Assistant, English and history 
Alexander Hugh Sproul, M.S. . . Business, salesmanship, education 

Marie Badger Assistant, typewriting, office training 

Florence Barnes Cruttenden, B.S., A.M. . History and social science 

Earl Nelson Rhodes, A.M Education 

Maud Lyman Harris, A.M Literature 

EsEK Ray Mosher, A.M. .... ... Education 

Walter Everett Parks Bookkeeping, arithmetic, law 

Alice Hayward Edwards, A.B Shorthand, typewriting 

Mabel Arnett, B.S., M.A English 

Amy Estell Ware, M.A. Geography 

Caroline Edith Porter, B.S., M.A. . . Children's literature, reading 

Esther Hale , Assistant, physical training 

Assistant, drawing and crafts 

Spanish 

Louise Caroline Wellman Secretary 



THE TRAINING SCHOOL 

Earl Nelson Rhodes, A.M. . . . , . . . . '. Director 

Daisy Beatrice MacBrayne . . . . . . Supervisor, Grade 8 

Esther Louise Small . . . . , . . Supervisor, Grade 7 

Beth Mariea Jellison Supervisor, Grade 6 

Mary Lillian Perham Supervisor, Grade 5 

Ruth Willey Supervisor, Grade 4 

Mary Elizabeth James . . . . . . . Supervisor, Grade 3 

Mary Foster Wade Supervisor, Grade 2 

Sybil Inez Tucker Supervisor, Grade 1 and kindergarten 

Mabel Clarkson Lowry * . . . Assistant, Grade 1 

Ethel Vera Knight . . Kindergartner: assistant in primary grades 

Eleanor Elizabeth Walker . . Special class 

George William Little Practical arts 

Helen Spencer Hyde . Household arts 




STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

SALEM MASSACHUSETTS 

AIMS AND PURPOSES 

The aim of the school is distinctly professional. Normal 
•schools are maintained by the State in order that the children 
in the public schools of the Commonwealth may have teachers 
of superior ability; therefore no student may be admitted to, 
or retained in, the school who does not give reasonable promise 
of developing into an efficient teacher. 

The school offers as thorough a course of academic instruc- 
tion as time permits and the claims of professional training 
demand. The subjects of the public school curriculum are 
carefully reviewed with reference to methods of teaching. The 
professional training includes the study of physiology and 
hygiene, and of psychology from a professional standpoint; the 
principles of education upon which all good teaching is founded; 
observation and practice in the application of these principles; 
and a practical study of children, under careful direction. In 
all the work of the school there is a constant and persistent 
effort to develop a true professional spirit, to reveal to the 
student the wealth of opportunity which is open to the teacher, 
and the grandeur of a life of service. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

It is advisable that application be made soon after Janu- 
ary 1, and that certificates be presented before the June 
■examinations. As far as possible, examinations should be 
<jompleted in June. 



10 

Candidates who have been admitted to the school, and who 
find that it will be impossible for them to enter, are expected 
to inform the office of their withdrawal immediately. 

No place will be held for a student who is not present at 
the opening of the session on Wednesday, September 12, un- 
less he has the previous permission of the principal to be 
absent on that day. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

I. Application for Admission. — Every candidate for ad- 
mission to a normal school is required to fill out a blank en- 
titled "Application for Admission to a State Normal School" 
and send it to the principal of the normal school that he 
desires to enter. This blank may be secured from the prin- 
cipal of the high school or the normal school, and should be 
filed as soon after January 1 of the senior year as the candi- 
date decides to apply for admission.^ 

II. Blanks to be filed by the High School Prin- 
cipal. — The principal of the high school last attended is 
expected to fill out two blanks, one in duplicate giving the 
"High School Record" and the other a "Rating of Personal 
Characteristics," and send them to the principal of the normal 
school. 

III. General Qualifications. — Every candidate for ad- 
mission as a regular student must meet the following require- 
ments: — 

1. Age. — A woman must be at least sixteen and a man 
seventeen years of age on or before September 1 of the year 
of admission. (To be admitted to the Household Arts Cur- 
riculum at Framingham, a candidate must be at least seven- 
teen.) 

2. Health. — The candidate must be in good physical condi- 
tion and free from any disease, infirmity, or other defect that 
would unfit him for public school teaching. 

' a supplementary form, which must be filled out by all candidates for admission to this 
school, must be obtained from the school office. 



11 

3. High School Graduation. — The candidate must be a 
graduate of a standard four-year high school, or have equiva- 
lent preparation. 

4. Completion of Fifteen Units of High School Work. — 
The ''High School Record" must show the completion of 
fifteen units accepted by the high school in meeting graduation 
requirements, a unit being defined as follows : — 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, so 
planned as to constitute approximately one-fourth of a full year of work 
for a pupil of normal ability. To count as a unit, the recitation periods shall 
aggregate approximately 120 sixty-minute hours. Time occupied by shop 
or laboratory work counts one-half as much as time in recitation. 

5. Personal Characteristics. — The " Rating of Personal 
Characteristics," and the moral character of the candidate, 
must, in the judgment of the principal of the normal school, 
warrant the admission of the candidate. 

IV. Scholarship Requirements. — Of the fifteen units 
presented for admission, at least ten must be selected from the 
list given below in Section V, and must be of a satisfactory 
grade as determined by certification or examination. Three 
of these units must be in English and one in American history 
and civics. Applicants for admission to the Practical Arts 
Curriculum of the Fitchburg Normal School may substitute 
evidence of practical experience in some industrial pursuit to 
meet a part of the above requirements. The Normal Art 
School requires in addition an examination in drawing. 

1. Certification. — Credit by certification may be granted 
in any subject in which the candidate has secured a certifying 
mark (A or B) in the last year for which such credit is claimed, 
provided that the student is a graduate of a Class A high 
school or is in the upper half ^ of the graduating class of a 
Class B high school. 

2. Examination. — Any candidate not securing credit by 
certification for ten units must either — 

1 The upper half of a graduating class shall, for this purpose, consist of those pupils who 
have obtained the highest rank as determined by counting for each pupil in the graduating 
class the number of units in which tie has secured the mark of B increased by twice the 
number of units in which he has secured the mark of A. 



12 



(1) Secure credit in the remaining number of units by ex- 
amination in subjects chosen from the list in Section V, or — 

(2) In addition to the required subjects, take three com- 
prehensive examinations aggregating six units from the subjects 
listed in Section V, these units to be chosen from three of the 
six following fields: (a) Social Studies, (b) Science, (c) Foreign 
Language, (d) Mathematics, {e) Commercial Subjects, and 
(/) Fine and Practical Arts. 

Since the second plan involves five comprehensive examina- 
tions, the examination papers and school record of candidates 
using this plan will be judged as a whole. 



V. List of Subjects for Certification or Examination 



Required (4 units) 



English literature and composition 
American history and civics 



Units 
. 3 
. 1 



Elective (6 units) 
The candidate may make up the total of six elective units 
from any combination of the subjects listed below, except that 
these units must be so distributed that the number offered in 
any one field shall not exceed the limits set for it: 



Social studies, 1 to 3 units: 
Community civics 
History to about 1700 . 
European history since 1700 
Economics . 
Problems of democracy 
Current events 
Ancient history- 
English history 
Medieval and modern history 

Science, | to 3 units: 

General science 

Biology, botany, or zoology 

Chemistry . 

Physics 

Physical geography 

Physiology and hygiene 



Units 
1 



^orl 
iorl 
1 
1 

hOTl 
hOTl 



13 

Foreign language, 2 to 4 units: Units 

Latin . . . . . . . . . . 2, 3, or 4 

French 2 or 3 

Spanish ......... 2 

German . . . . . . . . . 2 or 3 

Mathematics, 1 to 3 units: 

Algebra ......... 1 

Geometry ......... 1 

Arithmetic . . . . . . . . . ^ or 1 

Commercial subjects, | to 4 units: 

Stenography (including typewriting) . . . . 1 or 2 

Bookkeeping ........ 1 

Commercial law ........ ^ 

Commercial geography . . . . . . . | or 1 

Fine and practical arts, ^ to 3 units: 

Home economics . . . . . . . . 1, 2, or 3 

Manual training . . . . . . . ' . 1 

Drawing . . . . . . . . . | or 1 



The five additional units, however, necessary in order ta 
make up the fifteen units required for graduation, may consist 
of any work which the high school accepts as meeting its grad- 
uation requirements. 

VI. Place, Time, and Division of Examinations. — 
Entrance examinations may be taken in June and September 
at any State normal school (including the Normal Art School) 
at the convenience of the applicant. A candidate may take all 
the examinations at one time or divide them between June and 
September. Students who have completed the third year in a 
secondary school may take examinations in not more than five 
units other than English, in either June or September. Per- 
manent credit will be given for any units secured by exami- 
nation or certification. Credit secured for admission to any 
college of the New England College Entrance Certificate 
Board, by examination or by certificate, may be accepted. 

VII. Admission as Advanced Students. — A graduate of 
a normal school or of a college, may be admitted as a regular 



14 

or advanced student, under conditions approved by the 
Department. 

VIII. Admission of Special Students. — When any 
normal school, after the opening of the school year, can ac- 
commodate additional students, the Commissioner may au- 
thorize the admission as a special student of any mature 
person recommended by the principal as possessing special 
qualifications because of exceptional and vital experience and 
achievement outside of school. Special students are not 
candidates for diplomas or degrees until they qualify as regu- 
lar students, but they may receive certificates from the Depart- 
ment upon the satisfactory completion of the work of any 
curriculum. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE COMMERCIAL 

DEPARTMENT 

The requirements for admission to the prescribed course of 
four years are the same as for students who apply for ad- 
mission to the elementary and intermediate departments. 

Graduates of colleges, and graduates of normal schools who 
have had at least two years of satisfactory experience in teach- 
ing, may be admitted to special elective courses of one year. 

Graduates of normal schools who have had no experience in 
teaching, graduates of private commercial schools who present 
either diplomas from approved high schools or the equivalent, 
and who have had at least one year's experience in teaching 
or in business, and other persons presenting evidence of proper 
fitness and at least two years of satisfactory experience in 
teaching or in business, may be admitted to special elective 
courses of two years. 

It is a requirement for graduation from the commercial 
department that students shall have had the equivalent of one- 
half year's^ practical experience in office work not less than 
one year prior to the end of their school course, which, if 
obtained subsequent to the beginning of their normal school 
work, shall have been obtained under the general supervision 
of the commercial department. 

1 In effect beginning with the class of 1925; for the classes of 1923 and 1924, a full year is 
required. 



15 

Graduates from the full course will receive the degree of 
bachelor of education. Appropriate certificates will be awarded 
to special students who complete approved courses of study. 
Students who present full equivalents of prescribed courses 
may be admitted to advanced standing; in most cases the 
study must have included some professional work. 

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION 

The satisfactory accomplishment of the academic work of 
the course does not constitute a complete title to the diploma 
of the school. The power of the student to teach — judged 
from his personality and his efficiency in practice teaching — 
is so important that one who is manifestly unable to do so will 
not be graduated, whatever his academic standing may be. 

THE OBSERVATION AND TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

The Elementary Department. — In co-operation with the 
school committee of the city of Salem, the normal school 
maintains a training school, beginning with a kindergarten and 
fitting pupils for the high school. The training school is con- 
ducted in a modern building especially designed for its purpose. 
Besides thirty classrooms it contains an assembly hall, a li- 
brary, and rooms for printing, bookbinding, the practical arts, 
and the household arts. 

In planning the instruction in this school the aim is to 
connect it as closely as possible with the work in the normal 
school, to the end that the methods of teaching here may 
exemplify the theory which the normal school students are 
taught. A considerable part of the instruction in the training 
school is either supervised or actually given by normal school 
teachers, and the work in the normal school in particular sub- 
jects, as well as in the theory of education, is based largely 
on directed observation in the training department. 

In preparing students for responsible practice teaching, they 
are brought into contact with the training school during their 
first year in the normal school. Observation of teaching is 



16 

carefully directed by the different grade supervisors; written 
reports of different types of lessons taught by the super- 
visors are made by the students; and students participate in 
such school activities as seem feasible. Students are given 
the opportunity for such a series of directed observation lessons 
in as wide a range of grades as possible. General problems of 
classroom procedure are discussed with them by the director. 
The aim of the work is to develop a feeling for the problems 
of teaching, some familiarity with its technique, and some 
intelligent notion on the part of students of where they would 
like to do their practice teaching. 

Students in their senior year are assigned to the training school 
for a ten-week term of full-time practice teaching under the 
direction of supervising teachers who are responsible for the 
progress and discipline of pupils and the continuity and effi- 
ciency of the lesson preparation and classroom instruction of the 
student teachers, subject to the general direction and advice 
of the director of the school. 

Opportunity is provided for students who intend to teach 
in the first grade to observe in the kindergarten, in order 
that they may become familiar with the theory and methods 
of the kindergarten and its relation to the rest of the ele- 
mentary school system. Seniors also secure a considerable 
amount of additional experience in teaching as substitutes in 
Salem and in other towns and cities in the vicinity of the 
school. 

The Intekmediate Department. — Those students who are 
preparing to teach in the junior high school are required to 
have at least twenty weeks of practice. In the second year 
of the course each is assigned to one of the grades in the 
training school for a period of ten weeks. The practice in 
the senior year, for an equal period, includes teaching in the 
seventh and eighth grades in the training school, and in the 
junior high schools of Lynn, Chelsea, and Somerville. In 
these schools the practice is carried on under the personal 
supervision of the director of the training department, and the 
teachers and supervisory officers of the several schools. 



17 

The Commercial Department. — The necessary oppor- 
tunity for observation and practice teaching for students in 
this department is afforded in approved high schools with 
which arrangements for supervision have been made. 

Students are required to spend one-half of the third \'ear of 
the course in office work, for pay, under actual business con- 
ditions, in positions which have been approved by the school, 
and their work in these positions must be of such a character, 
both in quality and in variety, that it may be accepted for 
credit toward the degree of the department. In accordance 
with the rule of the Department of Education, this half year 
of practical experience must be completed not less than one 
year prior to the end of the school course. 



18 



CURRICULA FOR ELEMENTARY, INTERMEDIATE, AND 
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENTS 

A. Elementary Department 

Designed for students preparing to teach in the first six grades of elementary schools 
A period is forty-five minutes in length 





Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly 


OF — 


Name and Number op 

COXJKSE 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


FiEST Year 










English Language 1 . . . 


28 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


English Language 8 

English Language 9 j" . . 










38 


3 


- 


4 hours 


Literature 1 . J 










Arithmetic 1 . . . . 


38 


3 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Geography 1 . . . . 


38 


3 


Occasional 
field trips 


3 hours 


History and Social Science 1 


1 ^^ 
1 38 


2 
2 


.. 


2 hours 

2 hours 


Music 1 . . . . 


38 


1 


- 


1 hour 


Music 4 


38 


1 


- 


None 


Education 1 . . . . 


38 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Library Study .... 


19 


1 


1 


1 hour 


Drawing l\ 
Crafts 1 J 


38 


2 


- 


1 hour 


Physical Education 1 . 


38 


- 


2 


1 hour 


Education 11 . 


19 


1 


1 


1 hour 




20 


3 


19 to 21 hours 












Second Year 










English Language 2 . . . 


28 


2 


- 


1 hour 


Literature 2 .... 


28 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


History and Social Science 2 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Physical Education 4 . 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Music 2 


28 


1 


- 


1 hour 


Music 4 


28 


1 


- 


None 


Education 2 . . . . 


28 


1 


- 


2 hours 


Education 9 


28 


1 


- 


1 hour 


English Language 10 . 


28 


2 


- 


1 hour 


Nature Study .... 


28 


4 


- 


4 hours 


Physical Science 1 . . . 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Drawing 2l 

Crafts 2 J 


28 


3 


- 


2 hours 


Physical Education 2 . 


28 


- 


2 


1 hour 


Education 6 . . . . 


10 


- 


Entire time 


15 hovirs 


Education 13 1 . 


10 


41 


- 


4 hours 


Education 12 2 . 


28 


12 


- 


1 hour 




23 or 24 


2 


21 to 23 hours 



1 In conjunction with Education 6. 



2 Elective. 



19 



In April of each year an opportunity is given to members 
of the first-year class to elect the intermediate course, and to 
members of the second-year class in that course to elect the 
group of subjects to be pursued by each in the third year; in 
every case the election is subject to the approval of the prin- 
cipal. After this date no change in course may be made 
except for imperative reasons which could not have been 
foreseen. No course will be given unless there is a sufficient 
demand to warrant its maintenance. 



B. Intermediate Department 

Designed for students preparing to teach in grades 7 and 8 and in junior high schools 





Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly op — 


Name and Number of 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


First Year 










Identical with first year of A 










Second Year 










English Language 3 . 


28 


2 


- 


1 hour 


Literature 3 . ^ ;^ ;. 


28 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Arithmetic 2 . . . . 


28 


2 


- 


1 to 2 hours 


Geography 2 . . . . 


28 


2 


Occasional 


2 hours 








field trips 




History and Social Science 3 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Music 3 


28 


1 


- 


1 hour 


Music 4 


28 


1 


- 


None 


Biological Science 


28 


4 


- 


4 hours 


General Science 1 . . . 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


English Language 11 J. 


28 


2 


- 


1 hour 


Drawing 3| 
Crafts 3 / 


28 


3 


- 


2 hours 


Physical Education 3 . 


28 


■ - 


2 


1 hour 


Education 7 . . . . 


10 


- 


Entire time 


15 hours 


Education 13 ^ . 


10 


4» 


- 


4 hours 


Education 12 2 . 


28 


12 


- 


1 hour 




23 or 24 


2 


19 to 21 hours 



1 In conjunction with Education 7. 



2 Elective. 



20 



B. Intermediate Depaetment — Concluded 







Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly 


OF — 


Name and Number of 

COITKSE 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


Third Year (Elect One Group) 










Group I. Elect approximately 










25 periods from the following : 










English Language 4 . . . 


28 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Literature 6 1 
Literature 7 J 


28 


5 


- 


5 to 7 hours 


Music 4 


28 


1 


- 


None 


Education 3 . . . • 


28 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Education 9 . . . . 


28 


1 


- 


1 hour 


Physical Education 5 . 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


History and Social Science 4 


28 


4 


- 


4 hours 


Arithmetic 4 . . . . 


28 


3 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Geography 7 . . . . 


28 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Drawing 4 1^ 
Crafts 4 J 


28 


4 


- 


2 hours 


Education 7 . . . . 


10 


~ 


Entire time 


15 hours 




28 


- 


24 to 28 hours 


Group II : 








English Language 4 




28 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Literature 7 




28 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


Music 4 




28 


1 


- 


None 


Education 3 




28 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Education 9 




28 


1 


- 


1 hovu- 


Physical Education 5 




28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Geography 3 




28 


5 


- 


5 hours 


General Science 4 




28 


3 


- 


3 hoiirs 


General Science 3 




28 


- 


6 


- 


Education 7 




10 


- 


Entire time 


15 hours 


And either — 










Literature 6 . . . . 


28 


3 


- 


3 to 4 hours 


or 










Drawing and Crafts 4 


28 


4 


- 


2 hours 






22 or 23 


6 


20 to 24 hours 



21 



C. Commercial Department 

Designed for students preparing to teach in high schools of commerce or commercial depart- 
ments in high schools 







Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly 


OF — 


Name and Ntjmbek of 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


First Year 
EngUsh Language 5 . . 


38 


2 


1 


2 hours 


Shorthand 1 1 1 

1 










1 
or } . . . . 

Shorthand 71 J 


38 


4 


- 


5 hours 










Typewriting 1 1 . 


38 


- 


4 


None 


History and Social Science 7 


38 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Geography 4 . . . . 


38 


2 


- 


2 hours 


General Science .... 


38 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Bookkeeping 1 1 . 


38 


3 


- 


4M hours 


Education 4 . . . . 


38 


2 


- 


3 hours 


Spanish 1 1 


38 


4 


- 


5 hours 


Office Training 1 1 


38 


- 


2 


None 


English Language 12 . 


38 


1 


- 


1 hour 


Physical Education 6 . 


38 


1 


- 


1}4 hours 


Music 4 


38 


1 


- 


None 




21 or 22 


5 or 3 


24 hours 


gEQA'WTk "Vt? a TJ 










English Lang 
Shorthand 2 


uage 6 . . . 


38 


2 


Frequent 
conference 


2 to 3 hours 


or 


. 


25 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Shorthand 8 J 












Typewriting 2 . . . . 


25 


- 


3 


1 hour 


Office Training 2 . . , 


13 


6 


- 


3 hours 


History and Social Science 10 . 


38 


2 


- 


4 hours 


Arithmetic 3 . . . . 


38 


2 


- 


3 hours 


Geography 6 . . . . 


38 


4 


- 


4 hoiirs 


Bookkeeping 2 . . . . 


38 


3 


- 


4H hoTirs 


Education 10 


19 


3 


-> 


4 hours 


Spanish 22 


38 


3 


"" 


3 hours 


Salesmanship 1 . . . , 


19 


3 


4 weeks 


3 hoiirs 


Music 4 


38 


1 


- 


None 






23 or 26 


3or0 


28 to 29 hours 



1 See Spanish 1, page 27, and Office Training 1, page 44. 

2 To be substituted for History and Social Science 10 by students who took Spanish 1. 



22 



C. Commercial Depaetment — Concluded 





Number of 
Weeks 


Periods Weekly 


OF — 


Name and Number of 
Course 


Recitation 


Laboratory 

or 

Teaching 


Outside 
Preparation 


Third Year 










Literature 5 .... 


19 


2 


- 


2 hours 


History and Social Science 9 


19 


3 


- 


3 hours 


History and Social Science 8 


19 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Business 1 


19 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Bvisiness 2 


19 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Salesmanship 2 . ... 


19 


4 


- 


4 hours 


English Language 15 . 


19 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Music 4 


19 


1 


- 


None 


Business 6 


191 


- 


Full time 


- 


and either 










Business 3 


19 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Bookkeeping 6 . . . . 


19 


3 


- 


3 hours 


or 
Shorthand 6 . . . . 


19 


3 


- 


4 hours 


T3T)ewriting 6 . . . . 


19 


3 


- 


None 




26 or 27 


- 


25 or 24 hours 


Fourth Year 










Literature 4 .... 


28 


2 


- 


2 to 3 hours 


English Language 7 . . . 


38 


1 


- 


IH hours 


Shorthand 3 1 










or > . . . . 


28 


3 


- 


3 hours 


Shorthand 9 j 










Tjrpewriting 3 . . . . 


28 


3 


- 


2 hours 


English Language 16 . 


28 


1 


- 


1 hour 


History and Social Science 11 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


English Language 14 ] 










[ . . 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


English Language 13 J 










Bookkeeping 3 . . . . 


28 


4 


- 


4 hours 


Education 5 . . . . 


28 


2 


- 


3 hours 


Music 4 


28 


1 


- 


None 


Education 8 . . . . 


10 


- 


Entire time 


- 


and either 










Business 4 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Business 5 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


Business 7 . . . 


28 


2 


- 


2 hours 


or 
Office Training 3 . 


28 


4 


- 


6 hours 




27 or 25 


- 


26i to 27 J hours 



» See page 47, Business 6 (C). 



23 



Courses for elementary school teachers are marked A; for 
intermediate school teachers, B; for commercial teachers, C. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

English Language 1. (A, B) Preparation for teaching English 
IN THE FIRST SIX GRADES. Discussion, reading, written work, criticism, 
conference. — Miss Arnett and Miss FitzHugh. 

First year. Twenty-eight weeks, two recitations and two to three hours 
of preparation weekly. 

Forms of composition, paragraph, sentence, and correct use of words studied 
intensively to guide students in preparing work for teaching. Emphasis on 
accurate and systematic habits of study and presentation. A portion of year 
devoted to studying and preparing type lessons. 

English Language 2. (A) Teaching of English in the first six 
GRADES. Discussion, reading, written work, conference. — Miss Arnett. 

Second year. Two recitations and an hour of supervised study weekly; 
the amount of additional outside preparation to be determined by the 
individual student. 

There are advantages in a supervised study period: books and other ma- 
terial are at hand; there is a chance to obtain criticism and assistance while 
the work is being done; there is a distinct gain in power to do individual and 
intensive work. 

Definite lesson plans for each grade, illustrating different lines of work: 
practice in adapting stories and other material for use in schools; study of good 
language books and books on the teaching of English. 

Considerable training in criticizing the plans of other students and in dis' 
cussing them with the writer and with the teacher. 

English Language 3. (B) TEAcmNG of English in grades 7 and 8 

AND IN junior HIGH SCHOOL. — MisS ArNETT. 

Second year. Two recitations and an hour of supervised study weekly; 
the amount of additional outside work to be determined by the individual 

student. 

Discussion of subject-matter and methods of training in use at present; 
selection and organization of material to accomplish definite aims in language 
and composition; a systematic and typical course of lessons worked out for one 
of the upper grades. 

English Language 4. (B) Composition. Discussion, reading, 
themes, criticism, conference. — Miss Arnett. 

Third year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 



24 

Aim: to give advanced instruction in English, and training in oral and 
written composition. 

An effort will be made to correlate this training with that of other depart- 
ments, especially in literature, history, education, hj'-giene, and geography. 

English Language 5. (C) Rhetoric and composition. Themes, 
criticism, dictation, correction of papers, conference. — Miss Arnett. 
First 3^ear. Two recitations, one laboratory period, and two hours of 

preparation weekly. 

Study of the paragraph ; the sentence (including grammar) ; words ; the study 
of models; oral and written composition; spelling and definition; punctuation 
and capitalization. Aims: clear thinking and effective speech and writing. 

English Language 6. (C) Exposition, description, narration. — 
Miss Arnett. 

Second year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly, and frequent conferences. 

Collecting and organizing material and presenting it in oral or written form. 
Reading specimens of prose composition; guidance in reading for recreation. 
Many short and frequent long themes; training in securing and holding the 
attention of the class by reading aloud; giving abstracts of stories and of other 
reading; criticism; discussion. Aims: clear, full, and interesting presentation. 

English Language 7. (C) Business English and correspond- 
ence. — jSIiss Arnett. 

Fourth year. One recitation and one and one-half hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Aim: to give the student a thorough training in business letter-writing. 
The work of the second half year includes telegrams, cablegrams, postal service, 
and printers' marks. 

English Language 8. (A, B) Methods of teaching reading in 
grades 1 and 2. — Miss Porter. 

First year. Thirtj^-eight weeks. One recitation, and one hour of prepa- 
ration, conference, or observation weeklj'-. 

A course dealing with the "learning to read" stage, and phonetics. 

English Language 9. (A, B) Reading and story telling. — Miss 
Porter. 

First 3^ear. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

A course in the technique of reading and story telling which aims to meet 
both the personal and the professional needs of the student. The reading 
problems of grades 3 to 6, inclusive, are emphasized bj' means of observation, 
discussion, and practical plan-making. 



25 



English Language 10. (A) Practice and methods course in 

PENMANSHIP FOR TEACHERS OP THE FIRST SIX GRADES. — Mr. DoNER. 

Second year. Two recitations and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aim: to train students to write well on paper and on the blackboard, in order 
that they may possess the skill required to teach penmanship in the first six 
grades. Demonstration lessons before classes are required which give the student 
confidence and ability to teach. Class discussion of the best methods for secur- 
ing the maximum of results in the minimum of time. 

English Language 11. (B) Practice and methods course in pen- 
manship FOR TEACHERS IN GRADES 7 AND 8 AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. — 

Mr. Doner. 

Second year. Two recitations and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aims and methods as in English Language 10. 

English Language 12. (C) Beginner's course in penmanship. — 
Mr. Doner. 

First year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aim : to develop letter-form and freedom of movement. 

English Language 13. (C) Advanced course in penmanship to 

PERFECT FORM AND CONTROL OF MOVEMENT. — Mr. DoNER. 

Fourth year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 
Training to write well on paper and on the blackboard. 

English Language 14. (C) Methods course in penmanship for 

TEACHERS IN COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENTS OF HIGH SCHOOLS AND FOR SUPER- 
VISORS OF PENMANSHIP IN THE GRADES. — Mr. DoNER. 

Fourth year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Blackboard writing; pupils required to give demonstration lessons before 
class; class discussion of the best methods for securing results. 

English Language 15. (C) Penmanship. — Mr. Doner. 
One-half of third year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Application of penmanship to various uses in office work. 

English Language 16. (C) Parliamentary procedure and pub- 
lic speaking. — Mr. Sproul. 

Fourth year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

The conduct of public assemblages, speech composition, forms of public ad- 
dress, persuasion, processes of argument and refutation. 



26 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
Spanish 1. (0). 
First year. Four recitations and five hours of preparation weekly. 

Students entering with satisfactory knowledge and skill in shorthand and 
typewriting, or in bookkeeping, may substitute Spanish 1 and Office Training 1 
for Shorthand 1 and Typewriting 1 ; or Spanish 1 for Bookkeeping 1 and la. 

The primary aim of this course is to enable students to carry on a conversa- 
tion in Spanish. As far as possible the class work will be conducted in Spanish, 
and attention will be paid to situations arising in everyday life and business. 

Spanish 2. (C). 

Second year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 
To be substituted for History and Social Science 10 by students who took 
Spanish 1. 

Spanish texts will be used as a basis for conversation. Correspondence for 
business purposes will be emphasized, and fundamental points of grammar 
carefully developed. South American conditions and customs will be covered 
in the reading. 

LITERATURE 

Literature 1. (A, B) Children's literature. — Miss Porter. 
First year. Thirty-eight weeks. One recitation and one hour of prepa- 
ration or observation weekly. 

Aims: to lead to an acquaintance with and appreciation of subject-matter; 
to give an opportunity to study its use in the first six grades of the elementary 
school; and to give practice in selecting and organizing material for use in these 
grades. 

Literature 2. (A) Appreciation of Literature. — Miss Harris. 
Second year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

This course aims to broaden the student's appreciation of literature and to 
give him help in selecting books for his general reading. Both standard and 
current writers are studied. The topics covered are: the enjoyment of poetry; 
how to tell a good novel; the selection of biographies and other books of inspira- 
tion. Each student chooses his own subject and writes during the year three 
long themes suggested by the main topics of the course. 

Literature 3. (B) Teaching of literature in grades 7 and 8 and 
junior high school. — Miss Harris. 

Second year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 



27 

This course, which takes up methods of classroom work, embraces studies in 
poetry, in popular stories and standard books, together with the means of 
arousing in children an appreciation for literature and of cultivating in them 
the habit of reading good books. 

LlTEKATUKE 4. (C) GENERAL LITERATUKE. MisS HaRRIS. 

Fourth year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. Occasional papers. 

Aim: to arouse a keener appreciation and enjo3rment of good literature. 
The various literary types are studied with their best representative authors, 
and some attention is given to historical development. Works of authors of 
admitted superiority are used to establish a standard of comparison, and these 
are followed by a study of contemporary writers. 

Literature 5. (C) Commercial literature. — Miss Ware. 
One-half of third year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

A study is made of the best of the current literature that deals with com- 
mercial and industrial conditions and activities. It is believed that some of the 
hterature of this field is worthy of developing an appreciation for literature in 
general; at the same time it acquaints the student with the problems, ideals 
and significance of the wide field of commerce, in order that he may become a 
more intelligent high school teacher of commercial subjects. 

Literature 6. (B) Advanced course in teaching literature. — 
Miss Harris. 

Third year. Three recitations and from three to four hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

This course is for students who wish to specialize in teaching literature in the 
junior high school. It aims to give a background for the work, and is, therefore, 
largely academic. The subjects covered are: the technique of the drama, 
present tendencies of the theatre, Shakspere for the junior high school; the 
great epics; ballads and other forms of lyrical poetry; some popular prose 
writings; the course of study. 

Literature 7. (B) Studies in literary movements. — Miss Harris. 
Third year. Two recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

The aim of this course is not only to make the student familiar with some of 
the great masterpieces of literature, but to deepen his appreciation of signifi- 
cant changes in literary and social ideals. The subjects covered are: the short 
story, from Hawthorne to O. Henry; the development of the English novel, from 
the eighteenth century to the present day; the new poetry in its relation to stand- 
ard forms; current essays. 



28 



ARITHMETIC 

Arithmetic 1. (A, B) Methods of teaching primary arithmetic. 
— Miss Sperry. 

First year. Three recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

This course takes up methods of teaching arithmetic to children in the first 
six grades of the elementary school. Such topics as the following are studied: 
aim of work; development of the idea of number; logical and psychological 
arrangement of subject-matter; outlining topics; preparation of lessons; means 
of securing skill in computing; studies in application. 

Arithmetic 2. (B) Methods of teaching arithmetic in grades 7 

AND 8 AND IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. MisS SPEERY. 

Second year. Two recitations and one to two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

In this course is given a thorough review of the teaching of the essential 
processes in arithmetic, together with a study of common business and indus- 
trial applications of the subject. 

Arithmetic 4. (B) Teaching mathematics in the third year of 

THE junior high SCHOOL. MisS SPERRY. 

Third year. Three recitations and two to three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

This course is intended for students who wish to teach mathematics in the 
third year of the junior high school. It takes up phases of geometry, algebra, 
trigonometry, and a study of statistics adapted to the work. Text-books are 
reviewed and the subject matter covered in a practical way. 

Arithmetic 3. (C) Commercial arithmetic, advanced course. — 
Mr. Parks. 

Second year. Two recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

The course is designed to give a review of elementary principles in arithmetic, 
the application of these principles to commercial work, and methods of handling 
the subject in high schools. 

LIBRARY STUDY 

Library Study. (A, B) A course in the technical knowledge 
AND use of libraries. — Mrs. Blake. 

One-half of first year. One recitation, one laboratory or conference 
period and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aims: to bring students into close touch with the school library, show its 
resources and train to their efficient use ; to encourage observation and practice 



29 



in the home public library; to develop and foster the right attitude towards 
books and libraries. Topics : decimal classification ; arrangement on the library 
shelf; card catalogue; magazine index; book index and table of contents; refer- 
ence books; investigation of a subject in a library; government publications; 
book selection and buying; the general principles of classification and cata- 
loguing; relations between the public library and the public school. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 1. (A, B) Academic and methods course. — Miss Ware 
and Miss Flanders. 

First year. Three recitations, with regular field and laboratory work, 
and three hours of preparation weekly. 

First half year. General course in geography, consisting of a study of soils, 
relief, weather, and climate in relation to people, in the vicinity of Salem and in 
distant lands. Aim: to develop a fund of geographic knowledge that will serve 
as a background for teaching geography in the first six grades. 

Second half year. Methods course to prepare teachers for the first six grades. 
A study is made of the content of home geography, the plan of a course of study, 
methods of developing the subject-matter of geography in the successive grades 
and the use of textbooks, collateral reading and illustrative material. 

Geography 2. (B) Continental geography. — Miss Ware. 
Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly, 
with occasional field trips. 

Aim: to prepare teachers for grades 7 and 8 and the junior high school. The 
continents are studied to build up a knowledge of their life relations, and to 
illustrate various methods of approach and treatment. The adaptation of 
methods and materials to the grades occupies about one-fourth of the course. 
Acquaintance is made with all of the modern textbooks, readers and manuals, 
and with other supplementary material. 

Geography 3. (B) Junior high school geography. — Miss Ware. 

Third year. Five recitations, five hours of preparation, and occasional 
teaching lessons in the training school. Prerequisites, Geography 1 and 
Geography 2. 

Aim: to fit students to become teachers of geography in the upper grades or 
the junior high school. Two courses are outlined and sample portions of their 
content are worked out in detail. One course adapted to the seventh grade or 
seventh and eighth grades deals especially with the geography of the United 
States and Europe. The other course which forms a basis of work is com- 
mercial and industrial geography and is adapted to the eighth or ninth grade. 
Much "opportune" geography is used and the problem method is emphasized. 
A large part of the work is academic. 



30 

Geography 4. (C) Get^teral geography. — Miss Ware and INIiss 
Fl.ant)ers. 

First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

This course is designed as a foundation for all subsequent geography courses. 
A knowledge of the phj^siograpliic factors, their relations to each other, the 
diverse en\-ironments of the earth as determined by these relations, and life's 
responses to these diversities are the fundamentals of the science of geography. 

Geography 6. (C) Commercial and industrial geography. — 
IVIiss Ware and Miss Flanders. 

Second year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly, 
with an afternoon every third week for studying a local industry at first 
hand. 

Aim: to prepare students to become teachers of commercial and industrial 
geography in high schools of New England. A course for high schools is built 
up and discussed, based upon the four fields of commerce and industry: primary 
production, transportation, manufacturing or secondary production, and con- 
sumption. All modern textbooks on the subject are used for reference, and 
various illustrative materials are introduced. The industrial countries are 
particularly studied with especial emphasis upon the United States. Many 
industries are studied by means of motion pictures. 

Geography 7. (B) Junior high school geography. — INIiss Ware. 

Third j'ear. 'Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly, 

with occasional field trips. Prerequisites, Geography 1 and Geography 2. 

Aim : to prepare students to become teachers of geography in the upper grades 
or the junior high school. A study is made of regional geography for the seventh 
grade through the selection and interpretation of the geographic regions of a 
tj-pe continent (usually South America) ; for the eighth or ninth grades a study 
is made of industrial and commercial United States, — its place as a world 
economic power. Considerable attention is paid to the geography of current 
world events. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

History and Social Science 1. (A, B) Methods of Teaching 
History in the Elementary School. — Miss FitzHugh. 

First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly for 
twenty-eight weeks; four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly 
for ten weeks. 

Discussion of aims, courses of study. Working acquaintance with the illus- 
trative material of the field. Lesson planning, projects. Field trips. Observa- 
tion in grades. 

History and Social Science 2. (A) Miss Cruttenden. 
Second yesiT. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 



31 

First half year. Methods in teaching history in the first six grades: Dis- 
cussion of aims, courses of study. Lesson planning. Projects. Socialized 
recitation. Standardized tests as applied to history. Field trips. Observation 
in the grades. Practice teaching. 

Second half year. Methods in teaching community civics in the first six 
grades: Discussion of aims, methods, courses for first six grades. Close cor- 
relation with other subjects. Emphasis on the practical side, showing how 
under proper guidance pupils may profitably assume the responsibility of their 
conduct at work and at play, in school and at home. Field trips. Discussion 
of books and material available. Building up a civics library and laboratory. 
Observation in the grades. 

History and Social Science 3. (B) Methods in teaching his- 
tory AND SOCIAL science IN GRADES 7 AND 8 AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

— Miss Crtjttenden. 

Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Study of aims and courses of study. Practice in lesson planning, projects, 
question formation, debates. The place of the textbook. Collateral reading. 
Field trips. Observation in the grades. 

History and Social Science 4. (B) Community civics in grades 

7 AND 8 AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. — MisS CrUTTENDEN. 

Third year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

First half year. Study of aims, courses of study, textbooks. Making a com- 
munity civics laboratory and library. Field trips. Practical application of 
good citizenship in the school, home, community. Junior Red Cross, Boy 
Scouts, Girl Scouts. Vocational civics. 

Second half year. Problems in present-day democracy. Work based on cur- 
rent newspapers and magazines. Practice in looking up and becoming ac- 
quainted with local. State, national, international theories and practices. 
Throughout the course emphasis is placed on material that is usable in junior 
high school, and how it may be used. 

History and Social Science 7. (C) History of commerce. — Miss 
Cruttenden. 

First year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

Survey of field of commerce from ancient times to the present. Special 
emphasis on emergence of present-day problems from past inheritances. Study 
of causes and effects. Stress on the importance of commercial relations to a 
people's progress and to their institutions at all times. 

History and Social Science 8. (C) Economics. Contemporary 
economic problems. — Miss Cruttenden. 

One-half of third year. Three recitations and three hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

Principles of economics. Emphasis on the theoretical side with practical 
application whenever possible. 



32 

History -\xd Social Sciexce 9, (C) Commercial la-^. — Mr. Parks. 
One-half of third year. Three recitations and three hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

An inductive study of the appHcation of the principles of justice to ordinary 
commercial relationships, aiming to develop a judicial habit of mind in the con- 
sideration of business affairs, and to acquaint the pupil with some of the more 
common requirements of business laws. 

History aistd Social Science 10. (C) Present-day problems. — 
IMiss Cruttexden. 

One-half of second 3'ear. Four recitations and four hours of preparation 
weekly. 

A studj- of current news. Work based on newspapers and magazines, with 
discussions concerning policies of papers, methods of getting news, pubhcitj'', 
public opinion. Opportunity will be given for indi^ddual investigation of some 
present -day problems, with emphasis on their industrial and commercial phases. 

History and Social Science 11. Contemporary economic prob- 
lems. — !Miss Cruttexdex. 
Fourth year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Contemporary economic problems carried through type studies, current liter- 
ature and personal investigation. 



SALESMANSHIP 

Salesmaxship 1. (C) Eet-ael sellixg. — Mr. Sprottl. 
First half of second year. Three recitations and three hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

The study of merchandise, store system, store practice, business ethics, em- 
ploj-ment problems, drill in fundamental operations of selling. 

Students wiU participate in actual selling, in approved stores, during the 
month between Thanksgi\dng and Christmas. It is recommended that, when 
possible, students obtain a month or more of selhng experience before taking 
up the course. 

Salesmanship 2. (C) Advanced salesmanship and advertising. 
— Mr. Sproitl. 

One-half of third year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation 
weekly'. 

Aims: to develop the fundamental principles of salesmanship and to show 
their application. To study the relation of advertising to the sales department, 
other departments, and the business as a whole; a general survey of the various 
departments of advertising, including commercial art, display, engraving; 
periodicals, house organs and other media; trade-marks, etc. 



33 



MUSIC 

Music 1. (A, B) Elementary music. — Mr. Archibald. 
First year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Voice training, music reading, ear training, and writing of symbols used to 
represent the time and tune of music. The subject-matter of this course is 
practically the work of the first six grades of the elementary school. Melody 
writing as a means of illustrating the various problems is required. 

Music 2. (A) — Mr. Archibald. 

Second year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Aim: to familiarize the students with the music work of the first six grades, 
and to acquaint them with the best ways of presenting the problems. The child 
voice, song interpretation, and part singing are some of the topics discussed. 
Outlines of the grade work are given and teaching plans of the principal subjects 
are made. 

Music 3. (B) — Mr. Archibald. 

Second year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

In addition to the work of Music 2 some of the problems of the junior high 
school are studied. 

Music 4. (A, B, C) Music appreciation and general singing. — 
Mr. Archibald. 

Required of all members of the school. One recitation weekly through- 
out the course. 

Chorus singing, including community music and the study of standard 
choruses. Students receive instruction in the use of the baton and in chorus 
conducting. During the year several concerts and lectures are given by pro- 
fessional musicians. 

EDUCATION 

Education 1. (A, B) Applied psychology and pedagogy. — Mr. 
Mosher. 

First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

A study of the mind and the common laws governing its working and control. 
Planned to precede Education 2 and 3, and designed to give a knowledge of the 
functions and development of the mental processes and the means of acquiring 
knowledge. Lessons are observed in the practice school in order to see the 
exemplification of principles or types of lessons studied. Besides serving as an 
introduction to the teaching process, its purpose is to awaken an interest in 
the student's own mental life, and cultivate a more appreciative understanding 
of his associates. 



34 

Education 2. (A) Pedagogy. — Mr. Mosher. 

Second year. One recitation and two hours of preparation weekly. 

General and specific aims of education ; the psychology, pedagogy, and test- 
ing of subjects taught in elementary grades; problems of school administration, 
including discipline and control, classroom management, grading and promo- 
tion; vocational guidance; current educational problems. 

Education 3. (B) — Mr. Rhodes. 

Third year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

The larger problems of educational psychology: changes to be made in 
human beings; agencies employed in making these changes; variations in the 
capacities which human beings possess for acquiring the changes; economic 
methods by which the changes may be brought about. A discussion of differ- 
entiated curricula, special classes; technique of educational and intelligence 
tests; efficiency of school methods; remedial instruction for deficiencies dis- 
covered through the use of tests; psychology of school subjects. 

Education 4. (C) Psychology and personal efficiency. — Mr. 
Mosher. 
First year. Two recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

The course aims to give an understanding of the fundamental laws which 
govern mental acti^dty, and directs the application of such laws to the end that 
the student may in some degree consciously acquire economical methods in his 
study-work, and increased efficiency in his response to his general environment. 

Education 5. (C) Pedagogy and its application in commercial 
teaching. — Mr. Sproul. 

Fourth year. Two recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

The course embraces a brief summary of the history of commercial education 
in the United States; the place of commercial training in the high school; 
recent surveys; present status and tendencies; the organization and adminis- 
tration of a commercial department; the duties of a director; and special 
methods in the teaching of the technical commercial subjects. 

Education 6. (A) Practice teaching. 
Second year. Ten weeks, thirty periods weekly. 

Education 7. (B) Practice teaching. 

Second and third ^''ear. Ten weeks, thirty periods weekly. 

Education 8. (C) Practice teaching. 
Fourth year. Ten weeks, thirty periods weekly. 

Education 9. (A, B) Pedagogy. — Mr. Pitman. 
Second year of elementary course; third year of intermediate course. 
One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 

Contemporaneous problems in elementary education; special investigations 
and reports; school administration; professional ethics. 



35 

Education 10. (C) Educational psychology. — Mr. Sproul. 
Second half of second year. Three recitations and four hours of prepa- 
ration weekly. 

A study of the growth and the possibility of development of various mental 
processes. The aim is to present those facts and principles which have direct 
application to the problems of teaching, and to inspire the student ■ to a study 
of their application, and to develop the psychological basis of method. 

Education 11. (A) Observation and participation in the train- 
ing SCHOOL. — Mr. Rhodes and the several critic teachers. 

One-half of first year. One recitation, one laboratory period and one 
hour of preparation weekly. This is in addition to the observation which 
is carried on in the training school under the direction of the instructors 
in the several courses in the normal school. 

The aim is to introduce the student to the problem of teaching through the 
study of the organization of the routine of the classroom, the program, attend- 
ance and other problems; the observation and the discussion of the teaching of 
the supervisors; and such participation in the work of the training school as 
seems feasible. 

Education 12. (A, B) A study of the improperly graded child. 
— Miss Walker. 

Second year. One recitation and one hour of preparation weekly. 
Elective. 

This course is intended to better acquaint the teachers of elementary and 
junior high schools with problem cases they will inevitably meet. 

It includes the psychology of the abnormal. The State laws for the establish- 
ment of special classes will be considered; the history and function of such 
classes; the identification and selection of children improperly graded; the 
organization and equipment of special classes; methods of training. 

Education 13. (A, B) — Mr. Rhodes. 

Second year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 
Given in conjunction with Education 6 (A) and Education 7 (B). 

Problems growing out of teaching: problem of discipline; economy of class- 
room management; selection and organization of subject-matter; methods of 
teaching, the project method, socialized recitation, etc.; reconsideration of the 
psychology of how children learn, the laws of learning; building on pupils' past 
experiences; putting pupils in a favorable frame of mind; interests; making 
responses automatic; adapting instruction to individual differences. 

ART 

Drawing and Crafts 

Drawing 1. (A, B) A course in drawing, color, design and art 
appreciation. — Mr. Whitney and assistant. 

One-half of first year. Two recitations and one hour of preparation 
weekly. 



36 

The course is designed to create and foster a knowledge and appreciation of 
art. There is frequent observation of teaching and methods in the training 
school. The illustrative work is closely related to other studies in the curriculum. 
A general review of work experienced or observed in the public schools is in- 
cluded. 

Crafts 1. (A, B) A course dealing with simple projects in in- 
dustrial ARTS. — Mr. Whitney and assistant. 

One-half of first year. Two recitations and one hour of preparation 
weekly. 

Aims: to train teachers for the first six grades of elementary schools along 
practical and industrial lines ; to give the ability to make, read and apply simple 
structural drawings and patterns; to use simple hand tools; and to apply this 
knowledge of craftsmanship to other studies in the curriculum. There is fre- 
quent observation of the work in the training school, visits to shops, gardens, etc. 

Drawing 2. (A) A course in drawing, color, design, art appre- 
ciation and METHODS OP TEACHING. — Mr. WhITNEY. 

One-half of second year. Three recitations and two hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

Aims: to prepare teachers for the first six grades of elementary schools and 
to cultivate taste and art appreciation. Courses of study are planned and 
methods of teaching are studied and applied in the actual work in the training 
school. Blackboard sketching is applied in other studies in the curriculum. 

Crafts 2. (A) A course dealing with elementary projects in 

BOOKBINDING, POTTERY, WEAVING, ETC. Mr. WhITNEY. 

One-haK of second year. Three recitations and two hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

As in the previous course the aims are: the ability to make, read and apply 
structural drawings and patterns to the actual construction of simple projects; 
the ability to teach such work in the first six grades in the elementary schools; 
to appreciate purpose and fitness and good structural design; and to apply these 
to all industrial work. 

Drawing 3. (B) — Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of second year. Three recitations and two hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

This course includes harmonics of color to be applied to school projects, the 
interior of the schoolroom or home; plans and color schemes for flower gardens, 
etc. ; decorative and structural design ; pictorial drawing involving principles of 
foreshortening and convergence; picture study; nature drawing; and black- 
board sketching. 

Crafts 3. (B) — Mr. Whitney. 

One-half of second year. Three recitations and two hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 



37 

A continuation of Crafts 2, consisting of more advanced projects, adapted to 
the junior high school; observation and practice in modeling, printing, wood- 
working and the relation of drawing and the crafts to gardening and sewing. 

Drawing 4. (B) Methods and practice for students preparing 
to teach in grades 7 and 8 and the junior high school. — mr. 
Whitney. 

One-half of third year. Four recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Aims: to offer a general survey of the history of architecture, sculpture and 
painting; to familiarize the pupils with the work required in the higher grades 
along the lines of drawing, applied design, nature work, etc. The course com- 
prises the preparation and dyeing of papers, reeds and fabrics for the work in 
industrial arts; the making and application of good designs in form and decora- 
tion; the drawing of trees, plants and details studied in the nature course; and 
the drawing of simple objects and groups in outline, mass and color. The major 
part of the course is devoted to definite school projects, methods and practice 
teaching. 

Crafts 4. (B) Intended to familiarize the pupil with the courses 

OF STUDY, methods AND DEMANDS MADE UPON TEACHERS IN GRADES 7 AND 
8 AND THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. — Mr. WhITNEY. 

One-half of third year. Four recitations or shop periods and two hours 
of preparation weekly. 

Observation and practice in mechanical drawing, projection, and develop- 
ment; bookbinding, weaving, modeling, printing, and elementary woodworking. 
The school and home gardens are planned, drawings made to scale, and the 
color schemes applied. 

Crafts 6. (B) Industrial projects. — Mr. Little. 

A garden, comprising half an acre, is worked on the community basis, and is 
planted entirely to vegetables, which are sold to families living in the vicinity of 
the school and to local dealers. This garden is planted, cared for, and the prod- 
ucts harvested and marketed, by the boys of the seventh and eighth grades. 
Normal school students observe and assist in this work. 

There is also opportunity for a limited number of students to receive instruc- 
tion in both woodworking and printing. These courses are elective and are 
given out of regular hours. 

Crafts 8. (A, B, C) Cooking and Sewing. — Miss Hyde. 

The cooking course is designed to give a general knowledge of the principlies 
of cooking, food values, preparation of foods, and serving of simple meals. 

The purpose of the sewing course is to teach the student practical applica- 
tion of hand and machine sewing in making simple garments. 

These courses are elective and are given out of regular hours. 



38 

Gardening 1. (A) — Miss Goldsmith. 

Second year. Constitutes the work in nature study for the spring 
months. 

Aim: to give practical experience in garden work and acquaint the student 
with methods and devices for carrying on school and home gardens. 

Gardening 3. (B) — Miss Goldsmith. 

Second year. Constitutes the work in nature study for the spring 
months. 

Aim: to give experience in garden planning and the growing of common 
crops. Methods of cultivation and the care of both vegetables and flowers 
receive attention. 

Gardening 2. (B) — Miss Goldsmith. 

Third year. Constitutes the work in nature study for the spring 
months. 

Fulfills practically the same conditions as Gardening 1 (A), except that 
special attention is given to kinds of work required in grammar grades or the 
junior high school. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 1. (A, B) Physical training. — Miss Warren 
and Miss Hale. 

First year. Two laboratory periods and one hour of preparation weekly. 

This course is designed to improve the physical condition of the student. It 
includes plays and games and methods of teaching them, with emphasis on the 
learning of the games and playing them. Folk dancing and corrective exercises 
are important features of the work. 

Physical Education 2. (A) Physical training. — Miss Warren. 
Second year. Two laboratory periods and one hour of preparation 
weekly. 

This course aims to prepare the student to teach such exercises as may be 
used in the first six grades of the elementary schools, as story plays, folk 
dancing, outdoor and indoor games, and simple gymnastics, with special em- 
phasis on correct posture. 

Physical Education 3. (B) Physical training. — Miss Warren. 
Second year. Two laboratory periods and one hour of preparation 
weekly. 

Teaching lessons in folk dancing and games suitable for upper grades are pre- 
pared by the students. Some time is devoted to formal gymnastic work. Op- 
portunities to supervise groups of children in the playground and in the gym- 
nasium and to do some corrective work are utilized. 




o 

Q 
CD 

o 

o 

CQ 



39 

Physical Education 4. (A) General hygiene. — Miss Warren. 
Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Discussion of methods frequently takes the place of the recitation. The 
teaching of hygiene in a normal school has a twofold purpose, — to help the 
student to realize how he may maintain in his own body the highest possible 
working efficiency, and to train him to present the subject to children in such a 
manner as to bring about a marked improvement in their standard of health. 

Physical Education o. (B) Hygiene and sanitation. — Mr. Whit- 
man. 

Included in the courses: General Science including Hygiene 1 and 2 (B); 
see pages 41 and 42. 

Aim: to train students to present those phases of hygiene and sanitation 
which can best be understood by pupils in the upper grammar grades. Em- 
phasis is placed upon public health problems, as milk and water supply, housing, 
sewage disposal and infectious diseases. Attention is also given to the intelligent 
treatment of emergency cases. 

Physical Education 6. (C) Personal hygiene. — Miss Warren. 
First year. One recitation and one and one-half hours of preparation 
weekly. ^ 

The purpose of the course is to aid the student to form right habits of living, 
and to furnish accurate knowledge of social hygiene, including personal, family, 
city, state and industrial hygiene. 

SCIENCE 

Nature Study. (A) — Miss Goldsmith. 

Second year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

Occasional papers. Laboratory work given in place of regular preparation or 
recitation at the discretion of the instructor. The course is intended to give 
first-hand, working knowledge of the plants and animals of the locality and 
fit the students to teach nature study in the first six grades. Birds, insects, 
common mammals, trees, flowers, fruits, seeds, and germination are among 
the subjects taken. Soils, tillage and fertilizers are studied as an introduction 
to garden work. Project work is done in as far as it seems practical under 
present conditions. 

(See Gardening 1 (A) .) 

Biological Science 1. (B) — Miss Goldsmith. 

Second year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

A course primarily intended to lay the foundation for Biological Science 2. 
Field work is done as long as the season permits, and laboratory work during 
the winter. Project work is carried on throughout the year. Students are 
made familiar with the plant and animal Hfe common to the community, par- 
ticular attention being given to the economic aspects. Occasional papers. 

(See Gardenmg 3 (B) .) 



40 

Physical Science 1. (A) — Mr. Whitman. 

Second year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

The course is intended to afford a broad outlook over the field of science and 
an insight into the ways in which science is useful to man. Students report to 
the class the results of their own individual study. The project method is em- 
ployed to a large extent. 

It is recommended that the students put the major part of their time upon 
those science projects which are of special interest to them, or what they have 
exceptional opportunities to study. The natural interests of different individuals 
will, when brought together, give a course which covers the home, the school, 
pubHc utilities, industries and the world of nature. 

General Science including Hygiene 1. (B) — Mr. Whitman. 
Second j^ear. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weeklj-. 

This course is organized around the home, and includes the important sciences 
involved in the human activities of the home environment. The hygiene is 
closely interwoven mth the science, and has to do with personal hj^giene, health 
habits and those phases of hygiene and sanitation useful in teaching pupils of 
the seventh grade. 

General Science including Hygiene 2. (B) — Mr. Whitman. 
Third yesn. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

The plan of work is similar to that of the preceding year, but the community 
instead of the home is made the basis of organization. While the work is treated 
from the adult point of view, it aims to present both science and hygiene which 
will be useful to teachers in the eighth grade. 

General Science including Hygiene 3. (B) — INIr. Whitman. 
Third year. Three double laboratory periods: equivalent to three 
hours of class work and three hours of preparation weekly. 

This course, with General Science including Hygiene 4 (B) , aims to prepare 
one to teach general science and hygiene in the junior high school grades. The 
work consists largely in laboratory practice, including experiments, preparation 
of apparatus for demonstration and devices for teaching in the seventh and 
eighth grades or first year of high school. 

General Science including Hygiene 4. (B) — Miss Goldsmith. 
Third year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

The course is a continuation of Biological Science 1 (B), and is intended to pre- 
pare the student to teach in the grammar grades or the junior high school. 
It consists of recitations, laboratory and field work, discussions and presenta- 
tations by the students, with occasional papers. Special emphasis is laid on 
research work and field trips, and the correlation with other branches of study 
such as civics, geography, English, and physical science. The consideration of 
such larger topics as forestry, the natural resources of a community, etc., form 
an important part of the work. Gardening occupies practically all of the spring 
term. 

(See Gardening 2 (B).) 



41 

General Science. (C) — Mr. Whitman. 

First year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

The study of science in everyday life and of science in relation to the arts and 
industries. Students report on investigations or projects in addition to the 
formal class work. Many scientific principles involved in common processes 
are illustrated by demonstration. 



SHORTHAND 

Shorthand 1. (C) Pitman (American Phonography). Introduc- 
tory COURSE. — Miss Edwards. 

First year. Four recitations and five hours of preparation weekly. For 
alternative course, see Shorthand 7. 

Aims: to teach the principles, wordsigns, and phrases of the system thor- 
oughly; to read fluently from copper-plate notes; to develop habits which make 
for efficiency in taking dictation; and to build up a vocabulary usable at the 
rate of fifty words a minute. 

(For conditional substitute for this course, see Spanish 1 and Office Training 1.) 

Shorthand 2. (C) Pitiman (American Phonography). Advanced 
COURSE. — Miss Edw^ards. 

Two-thirds of second year. Three recitations and three hours of prepa- 
ration weekly. For alternative course, see Shorthand 8. 

Aims: to drill on fundamentals; to develop a word-carrying capacity; to 
ijrain the student to write from dictation from one hundred to one hundred 
twenty-five words a minute, and to read back or transcribe accurately. 

Office Training 2 is given in conjunction with this course. 

Shorthand 3. (C) Pitman (American Phonography). Methods 
COURSE. — Mr. Sproul. 

Fourth year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 
For alternative course, see Shorthand 9. 

Aims: to discuss methods of teaching shorthand, of handling dictation and 
speed practice, of correlating shorthand and. typewriting through transcription 
and office training; to prepare hsts of sources and kinds of supplies and equip- 
iment; to work out suggestive courses of study for shorthand and office training; 
to develop type lesson plans; and to compare textbooks and shorthand systems. 

Shorthand 6. (C) Development of amanuensis capacity. — Miss 
Edwards. 

One-half of third year. Three recitations and four hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Further development of individual skill in shorthand writing and its practical 
:applications. 



42 

Shorthand 7. (C) Gregg. Introductory course. — Miss Edwards. 
First year. Four recitations and five hours of preparation weekly. 

May be elected instead of Shorthand 1. 

Shorth.\nd 8. (C) Gregg. Advanced course. — Miss Edwards. 
Two-thirds of second year. Three recitations and three hours of prep- 
aration weekly. 

Maj' be elected instead of Shorthand 2. 

Shorthand 9. (C) Gregg. ^Methods course. — Miss Edwards. 
Fourth year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation weekly. 

May be elected instead of Shorthand 3. 



OFFICE TRAINING 

Office Training 1. (C) Office system. — Miss Badger. 

First year. Two laboratory periods weekly. 

Students entering -n-ith satisfactory knowledge and skill in shorthand 
and typewriting maj^ substitute this course with Spanish 1 for Shorthand 1 
and Tj-pewritiQg 1. 

Aims: to give the student facility in operating office appliances such as 
the multigraph, the typesetter, the adding machine, and stencil duplicating 
de%'ices; and to make and file work reports. 

Office Training 2. (C) Stenographic office training. — Miss 
Edwards. 

One-third of second year. Six recitations and three hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 

Aims: to correlate shorthand and typewriting; to give advanced work in 
the use of office appliances, in stencil making, and in filing; to acquaint the 
student with office routine as related to shorthand. 

Office Traintng 3. (C) Secretarial training. 

Fourth year. Four recitations and six hours of preparation weekly. 

Duties and responsibihties of the private secretary; personal quaHfications; 
the secretary's correspondence, treatment of callers and customers; prepara- 
tion of reports and outlines; use of graphs and charts; preparation of printed 
docimients; routine business; reference books and sources of information; 
relation to office force; the secretary as office manager; organizing the work. 



43 



TYPEWRITING 

Typeweiting 1. (C) Foundation course for beginners. — Miss 
Badger. 

First year. Four laboratory periods weekly. 

Aim: to make of each student an accurate touch operator by giving a thor- 
ough knowledge of the keyboard and of the use of the various parts of the 
machine, and by teaching him to write rhythmically. During the last quarter 
accuracy tests are given. 

(For conditional substitute for this course, see Spanish 1 and OflBce Training 1.) 

Typewriting 2. (C) Advanced course. — ^Vliss Edwards. 
Twc-thirds of second year. Three laboratory periods and one hour of 
preparation weekly. 

Letter arrangement, tabulation, legal work, specifications, etc. Special atten- 
tion is given to speed work and transcription from shorthand notes. 

Typewriting 3. (C) Methods course. — Miss Badger. 
Fourth year. Three periods, recitation and laboratory, and two hours 
of preparation weekly. 

This course discusses the work of Typewriting 1 and Typewriting 2 from the 
professional viewpoint. General methods are considered; textbooks are exam- 
ined and criticized; courses of study, adapted to different groups of students, 
are planned. 

Typewriting 6. (C) Amanuensis typing — Miss Edwards. 
One-half of third year. Three periods weekly in conjunction with Short- 
hand 6. 

Aim: increased excellence and attainment of commercial standards in tran- 
scription. 

BOOKKEEPING 

Bookkeeping 1. (C) Introductory course — Mr. Sproul, Mr. 
Parks. 

First year. Three recitations and four and one-half hours of preparation 
weekly. 

Aim: to teach elementary principles of accounting, the routine of book- 
keeping, and to develop appreciation of business situations and problems. 
(For conditional substitute for Bookkeeping 1, see Spanish 1.) 

Bookkeeping 2. (C) Advanced course. — Mr. Parks. 
Second year. Three recitations and four and one-half hours of prepara- 
tion weekly. 



44 

Special attention is given to principles underlying the construction of accounts 
and their classifications, and the preparation and interpretation of business 
statements to show condition and progress of the business. The application ol 
accounts to varied lines of work, elements of cost accounting and variations 
due to form of organization are studied. 

Bookkeeping 3. (C) Elementary accounting. — Mr. Parks. 
Fourth year. Four recitations and four hours of preparation weekly. 

A comprehensive study of balance sheets and statements of various kinds; 
a detailed consideration of assets and liabilities, depreciation, reserves, surplus, 
capital and revenue expenditures, statements of affairs, deficiency account, 
realization and liquidation statements; also the study of accounts of non- 
trading concerns, as societies, clubs, etc. Accounting phases of income tax re- 
quirements are studied. 

Bookkeeping 6. (C) Cost accounting. — Mr. Parks. 
One-half of third year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

This course includes factory cost finding, illustrating production records and 
their significance; work in the preparation of technical financial reports, busi- 
ness statements and balance sheets. 



BUSINESS 

Business 1. (C) Business organization and administration. — 
Mr. Sproul. 

One-half of third year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

The study of business as a science; forms of business enterprise; functional 
divisions of production, sales, accounting and finance; problems of manage- 
ment, labor and its reward; types of internal organization. 

Business 2. (C) Elements of banking. — Mr. Sproul. 
One-half of third year. Three recitations and three hours of preparation 
weekly. 

The economic service of banks and banking systems; classification of banks; 
the Federal Reserve system; foreign exchange and credit; the detailed study 
of the internal organization and procedure of a typical bank. 

Business 3. (C) Statistics. — Mr. Sproul. 

One-half of third year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation 
weekly. 

The course emphasizes the vital importance of statistics in the conduct of 
business. It discusses the collection and organization of useful data, and 
various methods employed in graphic representation. 



45 

Business 4. (C) Marketing and foreign trade. — Mr. Sprotjl. 
Fourth year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

A study of the problems involved in theory and practice, with the means- 
and methods in current use; present tendencies. 

The work in foreign trade is intended to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mentals and with the approved technique in the handHng of foreign trade 
documents. 

Business 5. (C) Transportation. — Mr. Sproul. 

Fourth year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

Aims: to develop a general idea of the importance of transportation to all 
business activity; to state the problems involved, and to study how they are 
being met; railroads and the shipping public; development of our railroad 
systems; classifications; rates; Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Business 6. (0) Business participation. 
One-half of third year. 

The full time will be spent in supervised participation in business in places 
approved by the school. The class will be divided into two sections, one sec- 
tion working in business positions while the other is attending school. 

Business 7. (C) Business problems. — Mr. Sproul. 

Fourth year. Two recitations and two hours of preparation weekly. 

An attempt will be made to apply the "scientific method" in the solution of 
various types of business problems as discovered in accounting, investigations, 
economic relations, marketing, governmental regulation or control. 



THE MANAGEMENT OF THE SCHOOL 

Students in a school for the professional training of teachers 
should be self-governing in the full sense of the term. Each 
student is allowed and is encouraged to exercise the largest 
degree of personal liberty consistent with the rights of others. 
The teachers aim to be friends and leaders. They do not 
withhold advice, admonition and reproof, when needed; but 
their relations in these respects are usually with individuals 
instead of with classes, and are of the most helpful and gen- 
erous nature. Those students who, after full and patient trial, 
are found unable to exercise self-control and unworthy of con- 
fidence, are presumed to be unfit or unlikely to become suc- 
cessful teachers, and will be removed from the school. Others, 



46 

also, who through no fault of their own, but in consequence of 
conspicuous inaptitude, or physical or mental deficiencies, are 
unfit for the work of teaching, will be advised to withdraw, 
and will not be graduated. 

Many matters pertaining to the general welfare of the school 
are referred for consideration to the school council. This is a 
representative body, consisting of the principal, the dean of 
w^omen, two other members of the faculty, and members 
chosen by each of the several classes. Thus the students, 
through their representatives, have a voice in the management 
of the school, and also assume their share of the responsibility 
for its success. 

Regulations 

1. Regular and prompt attendance at all sessions of the 
school is expected of every student. Those who find it neces- 
sary to be absent for more than a single day should so inform 
the principal. For all avoidable absence — including that for 
teaching as substitutes — the permission of the principal or 
dean of women must be obtained in advance. 

2. Students who are withdrawing from the school must 
inform the principal of their decision, and must return all the 
books and other property of the school which are charged to 
them. Those who fail to do so promptly must not expect any 
recommendation or indorsement from the school. 

3. Any property of the school which is lost or seriously 
injured by students must be paid for by them. 

4. Although the school has no dormitories, it recommends 
to students who are to live away from their homes houses 
in Salem where board and room may be obtained at rea- 
sonable prices. These houses, in addition to being suitable 
in other respects as homes for students, meet the following 
conditions which are prescribed by the State Department of 
Education : They receive no boarders other than students and 
instructors of the normal school; the same house does not 
receive both men and women students; the number of students 
in each house is limited to a small family group. 



47 

All students who board away from their homes during their 
membership in the school are required to live in the houses 
recommended by the school. Exceptions to this rule are made 
only for those whose parents wish them to live with relatives 
or intimate personal friends; but in such cases the parents must 
first inform the principal of the school of the circumstances, 
in writing, and receive his approval. No final arrangement 
for board or room may be made without the previous consent 
of the principal. No change in room or in boarding place 
may be made by any student without the previous approval 
of the principal. 

Students living in groups in approved houses are expected 
to form habits which are to the advantage of their own work 
and that of their companions. The hours from seven to nine- 
thirty in the evening from Monday to Thursday, inclusive, 
should be observed as a period of study. Exemptions to this 
rule should be made only with the previous approval of the 
principal or the dean of women. Except under unusual con- 
ditions, lights should be out by ten o'clock. If students find it 
necessary, for any reason, to be absent from the house on any 
evening they should inform their landladies of their plans. 
Boarding students may not be absent from the city over night 
without the consent of the principal or dean of women. 

Those persons who receive our students into their homes 
must, of necessity, assume responsibility for their conduct in 
the same measure as would be required of teachers or matrons 
in charge of school dormitories. They are therefore expected 
to report to the principal any impropriety of conduct on the 
part of students which ought to be known by him, or any 
behavior of theirs which would be considered improper in a 
well-regulated dormitory. 

Expenses, Aid, Loan Funds 

Expenses. — Tuition is free to all residents of Massachu- 
setts who declare their intention to teach in the schools of this 
Commonwealth. Students admitted from other States are 



48 

required to pay a tuition fee of fifty dollars per year, of which 
sum one-half is due September 12 and the other half Febru- 
ary 1. Textbooks and supplies are free, as in the public schools. 
Articles used in school work which students desire to own will 
be furnished at cost. The expense of room and board for two 
students rooming together, within easy distance of the school, 
is from seven and one-half dollars each per week upward. 

School Restaurant. — A restaurant is maintained in the 
building, in which is served at noon each school day a good 
variety of wholesome and attractive food at very reasonable 
prices. 

State Aid. — To assist those students, residents of Massa- 
chusetts, who find it difficult to meet the expenses of the 
course, pecuniary aid is furnished by the State to a limited 
extent. Applications for this aid must be made in writing to 
the principal, and must be accompanied b}^ such evidence as 
shall satisfy him that the applicant needs assistance. This 
money is received at the end of each half of the school year. 

Loan Funds. — Through the generosity of members of the 
faculty and graduates of the school several funds have been 
established, all of which, by vote of the Salem Normal School 
Association, are administered by the principal as loan funds. 
Students may thus borrow reasonable sums of money with 
which to meet their expenses during their connection with the 
school, and payment may be made at their convenience, after 
they have secured positions as teachers. 

Besides the Students' Benefit Fund are other funds founded 
by graduates of the school as memorials to Dr. Richard G. 
Edwards, principal from 1854 to 1857; to Professor Alpheu& 
Crosby, principal from 1857 to 1865; to Dr. Daniel B. Hagar, 
principal from 1865 to 1895; and to Dr. Walter P. Beckwith, 
principal from 1895 to 1905. The total amount of money now 
available is about four thousand dollars. The principal will 
gladly receive and credit to any of the above funds such con- 
tributions as graduates and friends of the school may be dis- 
posed to make. Frequently a little timely financial aid from 
this source may save to the profession an efficient teacher. 



49 



EMPLOYMENT OF GRADUATES 

The demand for teachers for all grades and departments 
insures immediate employment, at attractive salaries, for all 
graduates. The necessity for a rate of salary which will 
command the services of teachers of native ability, thorough 
training, and a professional attitude toward their work has 
been generally recognized. Towns and cities have provided 
for generous increases, and the State, by legislative enact- 
ment, has made provision for equalizing, to a considerable 
extent, educational opportunity through the appropriation 
annually of a large school fund. A generous proportion of 
this is used to increase the salaries of teachers in commu- 
nities whose resources are limited. Graduates of the elemen- 
tary course may now expect to receive from eight hundred 
fifty to one thousand dollars for their first year of service; 
graduates of the intermediate and the commercial courses 
receive substantially higher salaries. 

The principal is constantly called upon to recommend 
teachers for desirable positions. Correct information from 
the alumni regarding changes in their positions and salaries 
is of the greatest importance to them in securing, through the 
school, opportunities for professional advancement. 

The co-operation of school officials in keeping the principal in- 
formed as to the success of the graduates is greatly appreciated 
by him. 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATES 

There are offered at Harvard University four scholarships, 
€ach of an annual value of one hundred fifty dollars, for the 
benefit of students in Harvard College who are graduates of 
any reputable normal school in the United States. Boston 
University offers free tuition for one year to one graduate from 
each of the normal schools of New England, the student to be 
selected by the faculty of the school. 

Practically all New England colleges give suitable credit 
to graduates of the school for courses taken here. Teachers 



50 

College of Columbia University, also, is liberal in its attitude 
towards our alumni who go there for advanced professional 
study. 

NOTICES TO SCHOOL OFFICIALS 

All interested persons, especially those connected in any way 
with educational work, are cordially invited to visit the school, 
to inspect the buildings and equipment, or to attend the exer- 
cises in its classrooms or training school at any time and 
without ceremony. The office is open throughout the sum- 
mer vacation. 

Superintendents and other school officials are requested to 
send to the school copies of their reports, directories, courses 
of study and other publications of common interest. The 
courtesy will be appreciated and reciprocated. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
HiSTOKiCAL Sketch 

The State Normal School at Salem was opened to students 
September 12, 1854. It was the fourth normal school estab- 
lished by the State of Massachusetts. Its first building stood 
at the corner of Broad and Summer streets. This was en- 
larged and improved in 1860, and again in 1871. After 
twenty-five years the accommodations proved inadequate to 
meet the increased demands upon modern normal schools, 
and an appropriation was made by the Legislature for a new 
building, which was first occupied by the school December 
2, 1896. A new training school building was occupied for the 
first time December 2, 1913. The site, buildings and equip- 
ment represent a value of approximately one million dollars, 
and it is believed that the Commonwealth here possesses an 
educational plant as complete and convenient as any of its 
kind in this country. 

Decorations 

It is generally conceded that no building or schoolroom is 
finished or furnished which lacks beautiful and artistic decora- 
tions', not only because these objects are beautiful in them- 



51 

selves, but because of their refining and educative value. 
There is a silent influence resulting from the companionship 
of good pictures or casts, elevating the thought, and creating 
a dislike for the common, ugly, and inferior type of decoration 
so often seen. The school has many pictures and casts, the 
gifts of the students, the faculty, and other friends of the 
school. All these have been selected with great care and 
artistic judgment, so that the whole is harmonious. 

The Teacheks and Students 

The school during its history has had five principals and 
one hundred eighteen assistant teachers. The development of 
the practice schools began in 1897, and with them ninety- 
four persons have been connected as teachers. Twenty-two 
teachers are now required in the normal school and fourteen 
in the training school. 

More than seventy-nine hundred students have attended 
the school. 

The Location and Attkactions of Salem 

No place in northeastern Massachusetts is more easily ac- 
cessible than Salem. It is on the main line of the eastern 
division of the Boston and Maine Railroad system, connecting 
with the Saugus branch at Lynn. A branch road to Wake- 
field Junction connects the city with the western division. 
There is direct communication with Lowell, Lawrence, Haver- 
hill, Rockport and Marblehead. Trains are frequent and con- 
venient. Salem is also the center of an extensive network of 
electric railways. Students coming daily to Salem on Boston 
and Maine trains can obtain season tickets at half price. 
Trains on the Marblehead branch stop at Loring Av enue, 
on signal, and many students find it more convenient to pur- 
chase their season tickets to that station. 

Salem is the center of many interesting historical associa- 
tions, and within easy reach are the scenes of more important 
and stirring events than can be found in any other equal area 
of our country. The scenery, both of seashore and country, 
in the neighborhood, is exceedingly attractive. There are 



52 



many libraries, besides the free public library, and curious and 
instructive collections belonging to various literary and anti- 
quarian organizations, to which access may be obtained with- 
out expense. Lectures are frequent and inexpensive. The 
churches of the city represent all the religious denominations 
that are common in New England. 



LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The regular courses of instruction are supplemented and 
enriched by lectures and concerts which are given frequently 
throughout each year. Following is the program for 1922- 
1923: — 

Concert ...... Glee clubs of Framingham and 

Salem Xormal Schools 
.Concert ...... Glee clubs of Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology and 
Salem Xormal School 
Royal Bailey Farnum 
Louise S. French 
Phihp Smith 
Phihp Smith 

Charles Frederick Whitney 
Charles Frederick Whitney 
Carl L. Schrader 
Dr. Albert Parker Fitch 

Dr. Cheesman A. Herrick 
Ada :M. Fitts 
Mar\- ]M. Moran 
Estelle S. Keyes 
Rose Trainor 



The relation of art to general education 
Physical education 

After-war conditions in Europe 

The architecture of the simple home 

The furnishing of the simple home 

The s^miboKsm of color 

Physical education 

Commencement address : Education 
and Democracy. 

The keystone of the educational arch . 

Education of the mentally deficient 

Four years in Roumania 

Standards in social dancing 

Education of the blind 

Motion picture films: 
Mouth hygiene 
The asbestos industry- 
Massachusetts continuation schools 

Regional conference on physical educa- 
tion 

Annual meeting of the Xew England 
High School Commercial Teacher 
Association 

TraLQine for service .... 



John I. Lusk 



Frank W. Wright 



53 

The point of view in teaching geography Charles T. McFarlane 

Education and the civic life . . Mabel Hill 

A message to teachers . . . Royal B. Farnum 

If I were again a class teacher . . Andrew W. Edson 

Tickets for the concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
are obtained for students upon application. 

Picture Exhibitions and Lectures 

For several years the school has been utilizing the reflecto- 
scope, the stereopticon, and the motion-picture machine to at- 
tain educational ends. Nearly every subject taught in the 
school is served by these pictures. The fields of geography 
are particularly well covered. Talks on the pictures as they 
are shown are given usually by members of the faculty, but 
occasionally they are given by students or lecturers from outside 
the school. 

THE MUSICAL CLUBS 

A glee club, selected by competition, rehearses weekly, sings 
at various entertainments of the school, and gives an annual 
concert. An orchestra is also one of the musical activities of 
the school. 

THE ART CLUB 

The art club is an organization comprised of pupils of the 
school who desire to pursue the study of art to a more ad- 
vanced degree than the art courses permit. At the regular 
meetings work is done along industrial lines, which also in- 
cludes more or less of the fine arts. There are walks for the 
study of various types of architecture; visits to the Museum 
of Fine Arts and studios in Boston; sketching trips during 
the spring months; and papers by the members of the club. 
A course of lectures is arranged for each season. 

THE JOHN BURROUGHS CLUB 

This club is organized for the students of the nature study 
classes who are particularly interested in this work and who 
wish to gain a wider acquaintance with the out-of-doors than 



54 

is possible in the regular course. Field trips and personal 
observations are the most important activities, but excursions 
are made to museums and collections of note, and the making 
of bird feeders, nesting boxes or shelters, and bird baths also 
forms part of the work. Talks are frequently given by mem- 
bers of the club or their friends. Regular meetings are held 
once in two weeks. 

THE CIVICS CLUB 

The Civics Club was established to furnish an opportunity 
for the entering class to study matters of civic interest and 
to have informal discussions on these subjects; to take trips 
to the Legislature and other civic meetings; and to do some- 
thing helpful for the school. Each year outside speakers 
lecture. The club occasionally conducts patriotic exercises, 
prepares exhibitions of civic material, and presents a gift to 
make the building more attractive. Some meetings are purely 
social, and at others sewing is done for philanthropic organi- 
zations of the city. 

THE DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Dramatic Club is an organization comprised of a care- 
fully selected group of students who are interested in studying 
the drama and who show some evidence of ability in producing 
plays. The purpose of the club is to study the development 
of the drama, with emphasis on its modern aspects. This in- 
cludes a consideration of actors, authors, and stagecraft. iVt 
each regular meeting a reading of a short play or parts of a 
play make up the program, aiming toward the culmination 
of a more ambitious production later in the school year. In- 
teresting trips are made to Boston to see some of the best 
plays. 

THE COMMERCIAL CLUB. 

The purpose of this club is to promote interest in commercial 
work and in the teaching of commercial subjects, especially 
along the lines of shorthand, accounting, and general business. 



55 



THE TENNIS CLUB 



The Tennis Club is open to all members of the school. Its 
purpose is to promote a greater interest in tennis. At the close 
of each season a tournament is held and cups are awarded to 
the successful contestants. 



THE HORACE MANN CLUB 

This organization extends its membership to all of the men 
students of the school. It aims to promote the social, educa- 
tional and cultural welfare of its members by means of social 
events, lectures and discussions. The lectures are given by 
leaders in their vocations or avocations, and the subjects are 
usually of a professional nature. The club endeavors to pro- 
mote a good school spirit among all the students and to co- 
operate in any movement which is for the welfare of the school 
as a whole. 

OFFICERS OF THE CLUBS 
Glee Club 



Florence W. Johnson 
Hazel E. Syrett 
Lela E. Day 
Dorothy M. Donovan 
Fred W. Archibald . 



Secretary 
Treasurer 
Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 
Director 



Daniel J. Keegan 



Orchestra 



Leader 



Jeanette p. Vergona 
Charlotte Walker 



Mandolin Club 



Leader 

Secretary and Librarian 



Art Club 



Florence W. Johnson 
Joseph E. Henry 
RoVENA M. Sylvester 
Agnes E. Hart . 
C. Frederick Whitney 



President 

Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Advisor 



56 



John Burroughs Club 



Louis Komarin 
E. Ed WIN A Johnson 
Helen M. Bacon 
Helen G. Williams 
Gertrude B. Goldsmith 



Catharine L. Goodhue 
Clare L. La Bran 
M. Mary Lane 
Mary M, Driscoll 
Maud L. Harris , 



Mary L. Harrington 
Alice N. Flynn . 
Helen C. Menut 
Margaret L. Corbet 
Lena G. FitzHugh 



Gertrude L. Kirby 
Abigail M. Sweeney 
George K. Coyne 



Michael F. Higgins 

ISABELLE J. DeNNEY 

Alexander H. Sproul 



Frances M. Lee . 
Joseph J. Cantalupi 
Helen G. Hurley 



Dramatic Club 



Civics Club 



Tennis Club 



Commercial Club 



Chairmen of Sections 



Horace Mann Club 



Jeremiah F. Sullivan 
Joseph J. Maney . 
Henry F. Doyle . 
Daniel A. Manley 



George F. Daly . 
George K. Coyne 
Joseph J. Bevins . 
Daniel A. Manley 



Athletic Association 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Advisor 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Advisor 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Advisor 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



President 
Secretary 
Faculty Advisor 



Shorthand 
Accounting 
General Business 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



J. AsBURY Pitman 
Alexaistder H. Sproul . 
W. Everett Parks 
Myron R. Hutchinson 



57 

Advisory Board 



Principal 
Faculty Manager 
Faculty Coach 
Graduate 



OFFICERS OF THE SENIOR CLASS 



Eleanor M. McAuliffe 
Catharine E. Goodhue 
Margaret K. Gorman 
James H. Fitzgibbons . 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



MEMBERS 
J. AsBURY Pitman 
Agnes C. Blake . 
Alice H. Edwards 
Esek R. Mosher . 
Eleanor M. McAuliffe 
Katherine D. Manning 
Olive G. Hodgkins 
Anna Kinsella . 
Lucy I. Wishman 
Muriel G. Hale . 



OF THE SCHOOL COUNCIL 



> Faculty 



>■ Senior Class 



Junior Class 



58 



Register of Students 

1922-1923 

GRADUATES — CLASS CVIII — JUNE 16, 1922 
Elementary Course — Two Years 

Abbott, Alice . Farmington, N. H. 

Adams, Emma Esther Pittsfield, N. H. 

Amero, Margaret Lucy Gloucester 

Anderson, Bertha Marie Rockport 

Annas, Blanche Mildred Cliftondale 

Bradford, Ida May . . . . . . Swampscott 

Bullock, Ruth Merrill Manchester 

Burnham, AUce Merideth . .... Topsfield 

Cahill, Margaret Elizabeth . . . . Lynn 

CarroU, Ruth Agnes . . . . . Manchester 

Clarke, Alice Gertrude Revere 

Coates, Ezzie Norton Lynn 

Dewire, Mildred Dorothy . . . . Somerville 

Goodwin, Katharine Greenwood 

Gorman, Anna EHzabeth .... Braintree 

Grader, Hazel Elizabeth Marblehead 

Harkins, Mildred Marie Somerville 

Harrington, Marjorie Etheljm . . . Melrose Highlands 

Heron, Gertrude Leslie Essex 

Hill, EKzabeth Winifred Marblehead 

Hunting, Alice Adrienne Petersham 

Hurvitz, Leona Rhea Chelsea 

Kaplan, Tilly Ljnan 

Kelley, Elizabeth Rose Danvers 

Kelley, Ita Mary Maiden 

Kelley, Mary Louise Beverly 

Lanoir, Winifred Evangeline .... Wakefield 

Levy, Hannah Dorothy Mattapan 

Lowry, Mabel Clarkson Medford 



59 



Xundgren, Helen Margaret 








. Salem 


McFarland, Alice Marie . 






, J, 


. Somerville 


Meehan, Elizabeth Grace 








Salem 


Moore, Hattie Esther 








Wakefield 


Otto, Angle Elsie 








Rockport 


Quimby, Lillian Ahce 








. Everett 


Regan, Marguerite Julia . 








. Salem 


Riggs, Doris Loretta 








, Essex 


Ryan, Marion Agnes 








Everett 


Scott, Gladys Maglily 








Cambridge 


Shankman, Esther Judith 








Chelsea 


Stevens, Sarah . 








Salisbury 


Stromdahl, Grace Irene . 








. Lynn 


Tansey, Ethel Irene . 








. Cambridge 


Tucker, Madeline Conant 








. Gloucester 


Twomey, Hannah Marie . 








Newburyport 


Wade, Lydia Clementine 








Lynn 


Willey, Mildred Frances . 








Wakefield 


Intermediate Course — • Three Years 


Ahearne, Dorothy Claire .... Salem 


Brown, Ruth Harris 








Maiden 


Burnham, Alice Perry 








. Essex 


Doyle, John Joseph . 








Peabody 


Label, Ethel Gertrude 








Lawrence 


Lyons, Harriet Josephine 








Salem 


Monahan, Mary Anne 








Salem 


Monroe, Beatrice Wellington 








North Reading 


Reynolds, Frank 








Peabody 


Sisson, Elfrida Gertrude . 








Lynn 



Commercial Course — Four Years 

Bennett, Leah Evoline ..... Ashland 

Condon, Julia Veronica Medford 

Darling, Marjorie Emeline .... Easton 

Doyle, Irene Louise Danvers 

Fitts, Hazel Mabel North Reading 

Flynn, Mary Alice Salem 

Oilman, Ruth Mary Wakefield 

Oooch, Helen Cummings .... Easton 



60 

Hoffman, Esther May Whitman 

Seavey, Dawn Elizabeth . . . . . North Hampton, N. H. 

Vradenburgh, Marjorie Jeanette . . . Medford 

Certificate for Two Years' Work 
Commercial Course 

Nicholson, Bertha . . . . . . Lynn 



61 



Membership for the Year 1922-192? 



ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT 



Senior Class 



Ahearn, Mary Esther 
Amero, Margaret Lucy i . 
Anderson, Marjorie Arlene 
Bacon, Helen Maude 
Baggs, Susie Mildred 
Bailey, Mildred Richardson 
Barry, Eileen Alphonsus . 
Berman, Sadie . 
Bradley, Katherine Marion 
Brown, Eleanor Regina . 
Caldwell, Catherine Joanna 
Callahan, Margaret Mary 
Clark, Grace Osborne 
Cloran, Kathrjm Martha 
Coburn, Mabel Evelyn . 
Coffin, Josie Muriel . 
Cohen, Sarah Ida 
Collins, Katherine Louise 
Crean, Ella Frances . 
CuUen, Catherine Rita . 
Dalglish, Maidion Marshall 
Day, Lela Elizabeth 
Donahue, Gertrude Teresa 
Donohoe, Helen Rita 
Dorney, Mary Madeleine 
Dottin, Emeline Christine 
Draper, Mary Cecilia 
DriscoU, Agnes Barbara . 
Dunne, Mildred Mary 
Duquette, Beatrice Leonne 
Eaton, Ida Phyliena 



East Lynn 

Gloucester 

Durango, Colo. 

North Saugus 

Chelsea 

Lynn 

Cambridge 

Maiden 

Cambridge 

Beverly 

Ipswich 

Somerville 

Marblehead 

Lynn 

East Lynn 

Amesbury 

Windham, N. H. 

Marblehead 

Salem 

Lynn 

North Andover 

Bradford 

Somerville 

Dorchester 

Somerville 

Cambridge 

Salem 

Peabody 

Lynn 

Salem 

Seabrook, N. H. 



1 Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 



62 



Eustis, Eveljrn Annie 
Fogg, Viola Susan . 
Foster, Marion Elizabeth 
Freeman, Eleanor Davis . 
Gillespie, Grace Marie 
Goldman, Rebecca Sara . 
Gorman, Margaret Katherine 
Gosbee, Evelyn Maude . 
Gould, Charlotte 
-Hall, Matilda Veronica . 
Hathaway, Leona Augusta 
Herbert, Alice Esther 
Hodgdon, Phyllis Eloise . 
Hogan, Elizabeth Agnes . 
Holmes, Adeline Sayward 
Humphreys, George Jeanne tte, B.A. 
Jenness, Hazel Elizabeth 
Johnson, Emily Edwina . 
Judge, Alice Rose 
Kane, PhyUis May . 
Kelliher, Helen Cecelia Virginia 
KroU, Sophie Louise 
La Bran, Clare Louise 
Lane, Margaret Mary 
Lawson, Henrietta Jane . 
Leavitt, Doris . 
Lesses, Gertrude Falcon . 
Levin, Rita Esther . 
Luscombe, Grace Frances 
Lutz, Charlotte Wheaton 
Lyte, Elva Jean 
MacLaren, Helen Margaret 
Macquarrie, Evelyn Cecilia 
Manning, Katherine Dorothea 
Marston, Rita Frances 
Martin, Edith Creesy 
McAuliffe, Eleanor Marie 
McDonald, Mary Louise 
McRae, Catherine Margaret 
Morrison, Ahce Dorothy . 
Moulton, Grace Edith 



Marblehead 

Beverly 

Lynn 

East Saugus 

Winthrop 

Chelsea 

Somerville 

Gloucester 

Newburyport 

Cambridge 

Buzzards Bay 

Maiden 

Portsmouth, N. H. 

Salem 

Havana, N. D. 

Nineveh, N. Y. 

Maiden 

Georgetown 

Everett 

North Andover 

Beverly 

Wakefield 

Lynn 

Peabody 

Cambridge 

Lynn 

Salem 

Chelsea 

Everett 

Salem 

Lynn 

Saugus 

Winthrop 

Amesbury 

Lynn 

Marblehead 

Chelsea 

Salem 

Lynn 

Chelsea 

Lynn 



63 



Nelson, Alice Mae Salem 

Nelson, Mabel Irene . . . . . East Saugus 

Nichols, Adella Thelma Lynn 

O'Connell, Adeline Janette .... Salem 

O'Connell, Ellen Elizabeth .... Cambridge 

Patterson, Doris Mary Lynn 

Perry, Esther Rachel Cambridge 

Porter, Jenny May Salem 

Power, Abigail Gertrude Gloucester 

Prebensen, Valborg Henrietta . . . Cambridge 

Quill, Helen Frances Revere 

Quinn, Margaret Louise Kingston 

Reardon, Anna Gertrude .... Lynn 

Rose, Isabelle Chelsea 

Howe, Grace Emerson . . . . . Beverly 

Rudd, Doris Freeman Somerville 

Smith, Phyllis Gertrude Cliftondale 

Spracklin, Lillian Warren .... Chelsea 

Standley, Dorothy Winford . . ' . . Cambridge 

Stone, Gladys Gertrude Somerville 

Strout, Elizabeth May Millbridge, Me. 

Sudnovsky, Minnie Lynn 

SulUvan, Gladys Cecilia North Andover 

Sullivan, Grace Veronica .... T^orth Andover 

Sweeney, Abigail Margaret .... Danvers 

Syrett, Hazel Edna Melrose 

Trafton, Mildred Rose Beverly 

Verdi, Dorothy Margaret . ~ . . . Winthrop 

Vergona, Jeanette Pia . . . . . Winthrop 

Walker, Charlotte Wakefield 

Walsh, Mary Marblehead 

Ward, Rena Margaret, B.A Revere 

Wellington, Hazel Clinkard .... Somerville 

Wells, LiUian Gertrude Somerville 

Welsh, Eleanor Frances Medford 

Wexler, Rose Cambridge 

Wheeler, Marion Ethel Salem 

Williams, Gertrude Hazen .... Cambridge 

Wilhams, Helen Gould Beverly Farms 

Winer, Dora Lynn 



64 



Special Course — One Year 
Hayes, Helen Frances Milton, N. H. 

Special Course — Two Years 
Lafle^^, Katheo^n May Ljmn 



Middle Year Class 



Checkoway, Jennie Dorothy ^ . . . 
Duckworth, Pauline Elizabeth 

Junior Class ^ 

Albert, Sarah . 
Alpers, Esther Lillian 
Aronson, Bessie 
Auger, Eunice Ruth 
Barrett, Catherine Mary Rita 
Betz, Ameha Martha 
Bingham, Helen Beatrice 
Black, Margaret Ruth . 
Bloomberg, Jeannette Dina 
Bonner, Gwendoljm Ehzabeth 
Bradshaw, Mildred Louise 
Briggs, Thelma Helene . 
BroT\Ti, Mildred Hancock 
Campbell, Ila Pauline . 
.Canessa, Helen Rose 
Cass, Gertrude Gene^deve 
Cetlin, Mary . 
Champion, Marion Josephine 
Chapman, Alberta Virginia ^ 
Charles, Marion Rose 
Clark, Eleanor Annie 
Clifford, Helen Mae ^ 
Cole, I^label Ar\dlla 
Connors, Helen Delury 
Corbet, Margaret Laura 
Courtney, Dorothy May 
Craig, Lillian May . 
dotty, William Joseph 



Newburyport 
East Saugus 



Gloucester 

Salem 

Quincy 

West Boxford 

Andover 

Whitefield, N. H. 

Somerville 

Gloucester 

Chelsea 

New Bedford 

Somerville 

Danvers 

Chelsea 

Methuen 

Revere 

Topsfield 

Newburyport 

Lynn 

Cambridge 

Newburyport 

Beverly 

Essex 

Newburj^ort 

Danvers 

Greenwood 

Manchaug 

Lynn 

Somerville 



1 Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 
* Including students in the first year of the intermediate course. 



65 



Dealy, Marion Adelaide . 


. Winthrop 


Dogherty, Gardner White 


. Danvers 


Doherty, Alice Marie 


. Cambridge 


Donovan, Dorothy Margaret . 


. Winthrop 


Doyle, Arthur Edward . 


. Peabody 


Duffet, Marion Irene . . . . 


. Swampscott 


Dyer, Miriam Ethel 


. Danvers 


Eaton, Ellen Worthley . . . . 


. Seabrook, N. H. 


Elwell, Bertha Catherine 


. Annisquam 


Finn, Anna Elizabeth . . . . 


. North Andover 


Flanagan, Arthur Joseph 


. Peabody 


Flynn, AHce Nancy 


. Beverly 


Foster, Bernice Miriam . . . . 


. Danvers 


Fouhey, Mabel Reta . . . . 


. Danvers 


Frost, Harriett MacBride 


. Maiden 


Gilmore, Thomas Arthur 


. Peabody 


Glidden, Florence Albertina . 


. East Lynn 


Goodridge, Louise Althine 


. Sahsbury 


Greenberg, Annie Mollie . . . . 


. Gloucester 


Hale, Mary Ruth 


. Salem 


Hale, Muriel Gladys . . . . 


. Somerville 


Haley, Emma Elizabeth . . . . 


. Rowley 


Hall, Evelyn Parmenter . . . . 


. Peabody 


Hardy, Zella Wheeler . . . . 


. Georgetown 


Harrigan, Helen Kathaleen 


. Ipswich 


Harrington, Edith Mary . . . . 


. Lexington 


Harrington, Mary Louise 


. Somerville 


Hayden, Hilda Marion Ehzabeth . 


. Wakefield 


Hayes, Zelda Marguerite 


. Ipswich 


Hayward, Ruth Elizabeth 


. Lynnfield 


Healy, Martha Lucile ^ . . . 


. Somerville 


Heifitz, Martha Theresa . 


. Chelsea 


Hennessey, Mabel Agnes 


. Lynn 


Higgins, Dorothy Louise . 


. Lynn 


Hoffman, Etta .... 


. Chelsea 


Hooper, Vera Louise 


. Amesbury 


Horton, Doris Carpenter 


. Groveland 


Howley, Olive Frances 


. Lynn 


Hurlburt, Dorothy Lovis 


. Salem 


Hutchings, Mary Evelyn 


. Everett 



1 Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 



66 



Jensen, Jennie Marian 






. Gloucester 


Jensen, Mildred Catherine 






. Gloucester 


Johnson, Marea Mathilde 






. Peabody 


Kaplan, Edith . . 






. Chelsea 


Katz, Rose 






. Pittsfield 


Kenserstein, Rose^ . 






. Chelsea 


Keating, Alice Geraldine . 






. Chelsea 


Keck, Dorothy Inez . 






. Boston 


Kelley, Katherine Frances 






. Beverly 


Kelter, Ruth Anna . 






. Somer^dlle 


Kennedy, Mary Patricia . 






. Nahant 


Kiely, Anna Helena . 






. Lynn 


Kimball, Esther EveljTi . 






. LawTence 


Kinsella, Anna . 






. Wen ham 


Kovnit, Sadie . 






. Chelsea 


LaBran, Catherine Marie 






. LjTin 


Lawlor, Margaret Gertrude 






. Danvers 


Lear, Gertrude Louise 






. Lynn 


Linsky, Belle 






. Salem 


Lodie, Lillian Grace . 






. Maiden 


Long, Eleanor Rita . 






. Peabody 


Lowe, Cecihne . . . 






. South Essex 


Lynch, Leona Claire 






. Cambridge 


Mahoney, Agnes Marie . 






. Chelsea 


Marberblatt, Ida Althea . 






. Lynn 


McCann, Marie Elizabeth 






. Winthrop 


McCarthy, Arthur John . 






. Peabody 


McCormick, Mary Ehzabeth 






. Charlestown 


McDermott, Margaret Winifred 




. Salem 


McLaughlin, Mary Catherine 




. Dedham 


McNamara, Mary Elizabeth . 




. North Brookfield 


Menut, Helen Carr . 






. Newburj^ort 


Monahan, Rose 






. Maiden 


Moody, Lois Margaret . 






. Chelsea 


Moran, Mary Patricia 






. Winthrop 


Mortimer, Florence Mary 






. Danvers 


Moulton, Vera Mabel 






. ' Wakefield 


Murphy, Louise Barron . 






. Boston 


My then, Marian Louise . 






. Chelsea 


Narkun, Anna Magdalen ^ 






. Ipswich Village 



1 Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 



67 



Neenan, Alice Bernadette 
Nelson, Sarah Lillian 
Nickerson, Annie Matilda 
Nolan, Selina Margaret . 
Norcross, Louise Caloy . 
Nowell, Olive Esther 
Noyes, Mina Ballard 
Nugent, Mary Jane . 
O'Brien, Mary Patricia . 
O'Hare, Mary Agnes 
Ojampera, Martha Jane . 
Olson, Mabel Theresa 
O'Neill, Mar3^ Louise 
O' Sullivan, Alice Louise . 
Pearson, Vera Lucille 
Pendleton, EveljTi Hollis 
Perkins, Edith Staten 
Powers, Mar}^ Alberta 
Prendergast, Helen Mary 
Reilly, Rosamond 
Riclunond, Mary Charlotte 
Riley, Catherine Mary 
Ringels, Hazel Louise 
Rot stein, Anna Helen 
Rutstein, Sylvia 
Sawyer, E\ae Haynes 
Scannell, Anna Grace 
Scher, Dorothy Natalie . 
Schruender, Helen Catherine 
Shapiro, Mae Lillian 
Shaw, Carohne Mary 
Sheedy, Margaret Josephine 
Shepherd, Arlene Augusta 
Smith, Marcia Isabel 
Snider, Evilena Blanche . 
St. Pierre, Mary Jane Louise 
Tarbox, Elbridge Asa 
Thomas, Margaret Lorelei 
Wall, Margaret Hilda 
Wallace, Ruth Estelle ^ . 



Peabody 

Chelsea 

Essex 

Salem 

Wenham 

North Berwick, Maine 

Andover 

Winthrop 

Somerville 

Cambridge 

Waltham 

Pigeon Cove 

Peabody 

Cambridge 

Somerville 

Haverhill 

Rockport 

Cambridge 

Lynn 

Ipswich 

Chelsea 

Cambridge 

Woburn 

Chelsea 

Chelsea 

Lynn 

Arlington 

Beverly 

North Andover 

Chelsea 

Cambridge 

Salem 

East Ljam 

Woburn 

Newburj^port 

Salem 

Peabody 

Dover-Foxcroft, Maine 

Newburyport 

Chelsea 



1 Was a member of the school less than one-third cf the year. 



68 



Walsh, Alice Catherine Maiden 

Walsh, Nellie . Marblehead 

Watson, Frederick Earl Haverhill 

Wellington, Gladys May . . . . . Somerville 

Wigderson, Jeannett . . . . . Revere 

Wiggins, Catherine Ehzabeth . . . Somerville 

Wishman, Lucy Isabel Medford 



INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 

Senior Class 

Bums, Winifred Margaret .... Marblehead 

Connell, Mildred Mary ^ Swampscott 

Doe, Mary Reed Marblehead 

Doyle, Mary Hilda Danvers 

Fitzgibbons, James Harold .... Beverly 

Goodhue, Catharine Ehzabeth . . . Essex 

Hart, Agnes Elizabeth Beverly 

Johnson, Florence Wilhelmina . . . Lynn 

Kehoe, Anna Murray Lynn 

McHugh, Mary Rita Amesbury 

O'Rourke, Mary Patricia .... Salem 

Ryan, Sally Gertrude Salem 

Smith, Sybil Evelyn Greenwood 

Middle Year Class 

Berry, Hazel Ethelwynne .... Chelsea 

Boyd, Doris Irene Chelsea 

Bruce, Mariva Luranea Reading 

Chaisson, Mary Margaret . . . . Swampscott 

Coyne, George Kermit Somerville 

Doran, Joseph Elbridge Charlestown 

Finn, Catherine Mary North Andover 

Gearin, Margaret Mary Arlington 

Henry, Joseph Edward Chelsea 

Kirby, Gertrude Louise Danvers 

Komarin, Louis Peabody 

Nourse, Mary Apple ton Ipswich 

Paterson, Winifred Emeline .... Lynn 

1 Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 



69 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



Senior Class 



Beatty, Alice Louise 
Coskren, Alice Catherine 
Denney, Isabelle Julia 
Driscoll, Mary Magdalene 
Enright, Elizabeth Margaret 
Hapgood, Irene Lenore . 
Hodgkins, Olive Grace 
Jackson, Annie Margaret 
McCarthy, Catherine Edith 
Nutton, Doris Ellen . 
Sylvester, Rovena Mae . 



Bridgewater 

Lawrence 

Gardner 

Lynn 

Pittsfield 

Lynn 

Annisquam 

Salisbury 

Ayer 

Gloucester 

Derry, N. H. 



Junior Class 

In accordance with the requirements stated on page 14, paragraph 5, the members of this 
<;lass are this year employed in business offices under the general supervision of the school. 

Baldwin, Alice Eda Saugus 

Brooks, Anna Catherine Newburyport 

Carbery, Reina Julia Barre 

Clifford, Nora Margaret Northampton 

Cogswell, Victoria Maude .... Derry, N. H. 

Damsky, Rose Lynn 

Enright, Charlotte Mary .... Pittsfield 

Evans, Viola Pinkham East Saugus 

Fitzhenry, Eileen Mary Mona . . . Walpole 

Cowing, Lillian Gertrude .... Lynn 

Greene, Alice Katherine Arlington 

Hunt, Marion Anna Barre 

Kennedy, Mary Alice Medfield 

Mansfield, Ruth Pierce Southbridge 

Morrow, Alexina Dunbar .... South Hamilton 

Robinson, Vivian Dorris North Reading 

Stiles, Marjorie Marie Swampscott 

Yaluzki, Ellen . . . . . . . Barre Plains 



70 



Sophomore Class 

Abbott, Laura Frances Magnolia 

Ash, Francis Howard Holyoke 

Carter, Nellie Marshall .• . . . . Lynn 

Coville, Alice Beatrice Lynn 

Crowe, Florence Concord 

Daley, Ruth Mary ...... Arlington 

Donahue, Alice Veronica . . : . Boston 

Doyle, Henry Francis Peabody 

Duane, Mary Margaret Allston 

Gardner, Mildred Katherine .... Swansea 

Graydon, Helen Doris Ayer 

Higgins, WiUiam Thomas Robert . . . Peabody 

Huntress, Eva Mabel Wenham 

Judd, Lj^dia Emerson Easthampton 

Kane, Edward Francis North Abington 

Kealy, Madeleine Mary Lynn 

Kelley, Helen Matilda Lexington 

Lacey, Frozine May L>mn 

Leary, Beatrice Bridgett Lynn 

Lee, Frances May Monument Beach 

Maney, Joseph James Fitchburg 

Manlej^, Daniel Anthony .... Medford 

Martin, Gertrude Agnes Lawrence 

McArdle, Bartholomew Francis . . . Lynn 

McGrath, Agnes Teresa Salem 

McRae, Bessie Florence South Hamilton 

Mills, Louise Elizabeth Medfield 

Moore, Isabel Harriet . . . . . Cambridge 

Mulhane, Angela CeciUa Millbury 

Murray, Harriett Isabella .... Ljmn 

Oliver, Margaret Evelyn Gloucester 

O'Neil, Helen Barbara . . . . . Danvers 

O'Neil, Isobel Eunice Fall River 

Phipps, Olive Blackmer Everett 

Quinn, Helen Mary Lowell 

Risman, Edith Ljmn 

Rooney, Mary Grace Jamaica Plain. 

Rush, Mary Eileen Forest Hills 

Sculley, Eleanore Catherine .... Somerville 



71 



Shea, Mary Gertrude 
Smith, Marion EHzabeth 
Solomon, EHzabeth . 
SulHvan, Mary EHzabeth 
Troy, Anna Frances . 
Wright, RusseU Albin 



Fkeshman Class 



Amero, Annie ArdeUe 
Anderson, LyyHa Esther . 
Barrett, Thomas Bruce . 
Barry, Mary Ellen . 
Barwick, Dorothy Charlotte 
BeU, Cora Mae . 
Bishop, Dorothy Eraser . 
Bowie, Lydia Marion 
Burnham, Elizabeth Cook 
Burke, Jennie 
Burns, Mary Ethel . 
CarroU, Mary Josephine . 
Comey, Margaret Mary ^ 
Corkum, Pauline Harriett 
Creeden, Eileen Mary ^ . 
Curran, Margaret Agnes . 
D alley, Margaret 
Dalton, Mary Frances 
Dolan, Myrtle Rose . 
Dolphin, Earle Wentzel . 
Donovan, Anna Travis . 
Downs, Lucile Elizabeth . 
Doyle, Dorothy Mary 
Faulds, Evelyn Eloise 
Frost, Mildred Grace . . 
Gorman, Nora Louise 
Gould, Minnie Laurence . 
Gravel, Lena Margaret . 
Harrington, Mary Genevieve 
Hayes, Margaret Dolores 
Hayward, Rache May 
Hicks, Walter Gordon 



Holyoke 

Cliftondale 

Reading 

Peabody 

Southbridge 

North Attleborough 



Gloucester 

Gloucester 

Somerville 

Cambridge 

Naugatuck, Conn. 

Dorchester 

Lynn 

Gloucester 

Gloucester 

Lynn 

Hamilton 

Cambridge 

Dorchester 

Gloucester 

Danvers 

Wheelwright 

Lexington 

Walpole 

Hingham 

East Lynn 

Charlestown 

Killingly, Conn. 

Salem 

WoUaston 

Holyoke 

South Hamilton 

South Hamilton 

Ware 

Fall River 

Bridgewater 

Waltham 

Gloucester 



1 Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 



72 



Higgins, James Leo . 
Husson, Chesley Harwood 
Johnson, Edith Ruth 
Johnson, Jessie Evelyn 
Johnson, Mary Porter 
Jones, Miriam Alice . 
Keniley, Helen CeceHa 
Larson, Florence Christina 
Lundergan, Edward Michael 
Macdonald, Ethel Gladys 
Marr, Ruth Douglass 
McEachen, Mary Catherine 
McGuire, Bernice Josephine 
Moran, Cecelia Theresa . 
Mulcahy, Eleanor Elizabeth 
Nagel, Dorothea Martin . 
Newmark, Florence Barbara ^ 
O'Connor, Marion Esther 
Olson, Lillian Matilda ^ 
O'Neill, James Joseph 
Pearson, Elsa Kristina 
Reidpath, Rosalind . 
RejTiolds, Almira 
Richards, George Anthony 
Riley, Mary Clare Fracces 
Smith, Beatrice Alice 
Steinberg, Ethel 
St. Clair, Esther Marie . 
Stone, LiUian Helen . 
Teachman, Albert Gardner, Jr. 
Thompson, John Stanley 
Twomey, Thomas Joseph ^ 



Danvers 

Lynn 

Leominster 

Grafton 

Leominster 

Salem 

New Haven, Conn. 

Pigeon Cove 

Salem 

Raynham 

Rowley 

Gloucester 

New Haven, Conn. 

Leominster 

Cohasset 

Hadley 

Leominster 

Revere 

Gloucester 

Danvers 

Winthrop 

Swampscott 

Fall River 

Peabody 

Lynn 

Ipswich 

Medford 

Palmer 

Ayer 

New Bedford 

Gloucester 

LjTin 



Special Course — Two Years 
Second Year 

Cantalupi, Joseph John Beverly 

Daly, George Francis . . . . . South Boston 
Higgins, Michael Francis . . . . Peabody 
Hurley, Helen Gertrude Dorchester 



Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 



73 



McDade, Josephine Helen 
Murphy, Grace Ann 
Parker, Mabel Buckingham 
Sullivan, Jeremiah Francis 
Walker, Helen Mae . 



Lawrence 

Lawrence 

Attleborough 

Peabody 

Medford 



First Year 

Bevins, Joseph Johnson .... Salem 

Chapin, Irene Anna Chicopee Falls 

Chase, Frank Sanborn . . . . . Hyde Park 

Clancey, Frances Jane ^ Gloucester 

Dugan, Agnes Veronica Andover 

Ellis, Katherine Gertrude .... Peabody 

Flaherty, John Vincent Charlestown 

Foley, Leone Bertille West Lynn 

Keegan, Daniel Joseph Peabody 

Somers, Helen Maud Lynn 

Waldron, John Thomas Peabody 

Special Course — One Year 

Des Ormeaux, Beatrice Edith . . . Haverhill 



1 Was a member of the school less than one-third of the year. 



74 



SUMMARY 



Returning. 



Totals 
Entering, by Depart- 
ments. 



Elementary department: 

Senior class 

Special, one year . . . . 
Special, two years 
Middle year class . . . . 
Junior class 

Intermediate department: 
Senior class . . , . , 
Middle year class . . , . 

Commercial department: 

Senior class 

Junior class ^ . . . . 

Sophomore class . . . . 
Freshman class . . . . 
Special, two years (second year) 
Special, two years (first j'ear) 
Special, one year . . . . 



107 



2 

2 

13 
13 

11 

181 

45 

1 



221 



5 
1 
1 

153 



63 

11 
1 



235 



\ 271 



26 



i- 159 



456 



Whole number of students from opening of school 7,948 

Whole number of graduates . 4,471 ^ 

Xumber of certificates for special course of one or two years 164' 

Total enrollment in training school for year ending June 30, 1922 .... 517 



1 Employed, for the year, in business offices under the general supervision of the school. 

2 Of whom ten have received two diplomas. 

* Of whom twenty-five also received diplomas and are included in the total number of 
graduates. 



75 



Officers of the 
Salem Normal Association, 1922-192? 



Miss Nellie B. Alleist, Lynnfield (Class LXI) 

Mrs. Mabel Lindsey Williams, Peabody (Class 

LXXIX) ' . 

Miss Alice Felton Hammond, Danvers (Class 

XLIII) 

Miss Lena Grayson FitzHugh, Amesbury (Class 

XCVI) 

Miss Madeleine Louise Slade, Danvers (Class 

XCVI) 

Mrs. Anna Vollor Nichols, Salem (Class XCV) 

Oilman Clifton Harvey, Gloucester (Class CHI) 
Mrs. Martha Abbott Ward, Lynn (Class XX) 
Mrs. Ethel Walcott Mussey, Salem (Class 

CXXXVIII) 

Mrs. Mary Gate Smith, Boston (Class XLV) 
Miss Lizzie Lee Bacheller, Lynn (Class XXXVII) 
Miss Nora Clair Pike, Winthrop (Class XCIX) 
Miss Helen Maria Miner, Salem (Class XXIII) . 
Miss Nellie Stearns Messer, Salem (Class 

LXXXIX) 

Mrs. Clara Mansfield Munroe, Peabody (Class 

LXI) \ 

Miss Olive Mary Adams, Beverly (Class XCII) 
Miss Gertrude Margaret Ross, Salem (Class CII) 



President 

Vice-President 

Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Sec- 
retary 

Treasurer 

Custodian of Rec- 
ords 
Auditor 



> Directors 



Nominating Com- 
mittee